Refugee supports Priti Patel’s crackdown on immigrants as first Afghan Conservative adviser


A refugee who arrived in Britain in the back of a truck and is now set to become Afghanistan’s first Tory adviser has backed Home Secretary Priti Patel’s crackdown on illegal immigration.

Darius Nasimi, 22, who hopes to make history in next year’s local election for Hounslow’s council in west London, told the Mail on Sunday: ‘I don’t always support what Priti is saying Patel, but I think there should be good border controls and other countries in Europe need to take in more refugees. ‘

Mr. Nasimi’s parents fled Afghanistan in 1999 after the Taliban took control, and he was born during their nine-month journey through Europe.

After paying smugglers to bring them into the UK, Mr Nasimi arrived in Dover with his two older sisters in a refrigerated truck.

Darius Nasimi (pictured), 22, who hopes to make history in next year’s Hounslow Council election in London, has said the Conservative Party’s view of being anti-immigration is wrong

Immigration officials found their hiding place, but the freezing ten-hour drive from Belgium left the family hanging on to life and they were rushed to hospital for treatment.

They were subsequently granted asylum and became British citizens in 2004, settling in London.

Last year Mr Nasimi graduated in philosophy from King’s College London and recently helped Afghan refugees who were evacuated earlier this year.

He said the Conservative Party’s portrayal of anti-immigration was false, adding, “The Conservatives push you to do something, not just receive benefits that make you lazy and take you away from work or business.

“That’s why they’re the best match for migrants like me.

Mr Nasimi's parents fled Afghanistan in 1999 after the Taliban took control, and he (pictured at the age of five in 2004 in Lewisham) was born during their nine-month journey through Europe.

Mr Nasimi’s parents fled Afghanistan in 1999 after the Taliban took control, and he (pictured at the age of five in 2004 in Lewisham) was born during their nine-month journey through Europe.

Despite his background, Mr Nasimi supports Priti Patel (pictured) 's tougher stance on cross-Channel migration

Despite his background, Mr Nasimi supports Priti Patel (pictured) ‘s tougher stance on cross-Channel migration

“I also like the emphasis on British values, the rule of law, democracy and individual freedom.”

Despite his track record, Mr Nasimi supports Ms Patel’s stronger stance on cross-Channel migration – so far this year more than 26,000 people have arrived in small boats.

“Illegal immigration is a permanent problem, but at the same time there has to be some kind of control and we have to reduce the pressure on the government,” he said.

“Some people come to the UK for economic reasons. They are not all refugees fleeing persecution or conflict. I think border control is very important.

The government has been criticized for its handling of the withdrawal of troops from Afghanistan, but Nasimi said he only felt gratitude for the 15,000 people who were flown to safety.

He currently works for the Association for Afghanistan and Central Asia, a charity founded by his father, Dr Nooralhaq Nasimi, which led efforts to provide assistance to Afghans who were evacuated in August.

So far this year, more than 26,000 people have crossed the Channel in small boats.  Pictured: Around 100 migrants are rescued by the RNLI Coast Guard

So far this year, more than 26,000 people have crossed the Channel in small boats. Pictured: Around 100 migrants are rescued by the RNLI Coast Guard

Dr Nasimi, 54, a father of four, said he fled Afghanistan for fear the Taliban would kill him because he was a liberal-minded scientist who had been educated abroad.

The family’s trip to Britain took them via Ukraine, Hungary, Slovakia, Austria, Germany and Belgium. They were then crammed inside the truck by traffickers in Antwerp.

Two of Mr. Nasimi’s three sisters work for the government.

Shabnam, 30, was appointed political adviser to Victoria Atkins, the new Afghan resettlement minister, last week.

Rabia, 27, a Cambridge graduate, works as an advisor in the Department of Upgrading, Housing and Communities.


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