Belgium housing – RGLB http://rglb.org/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 12:32:49 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://rglb.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T174556.459-150x150.png Belgium housing – RGLB http://rglb.org/ 32 32 RTL Today – Mortgage madness? https://rglb.org/rtl-today-mortgage-madness/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 12:32:49 +0000 https://rglb.org/rtl-today-mortgage-madness/ Average mortgage payments in Luxembourg are 51.1% higher than the average rent, while rent and house prices are the highest in the group of developed OECD countries. The so-called price gap between house prices and rents is an indicator of the cost of buying a house with a standard mortgage compared to the average monthly […]]]>

Average mortgage payments in Luxembourg are 51.1% higher than the average rent, while rent and house prices are the highest in the group of developed OECD countries.

The so-called price gap between house prices and rents is an indicator of the cost of buying a house with a standard mortgage compared to the average monthly rent.

According to a study by price comparison site Compare The Market, the average rent in Luxembourg for a three-bedroom house is $3,017 (€2,634) per month, while the equivalent monthly mortgage payment is $4,558. $ (€3,980).

Latvia, second, has a price gap of 42.5%, but the prices for rents ($582 or €508 per month) and mortgages ($830 or €725 per month) are much lower.

In two OECD countries, average mortgage payments are lower than rents. The price gap in Finland is -2.1%, with average mortgage payments of $1,258 (€1,098) representing slightly less than an average rent of $1,285 (€1,122). Italy also benefits from mortgages that are cheaper than rental prices, with a price gap calculated at -0.9%.

Highest rent and mortgage prices

At around $4,558 (€3,980) per month, average monthly mortgage payments in Luxembourg are well above the OECD average. Ranked in this way, second-place Switzerland is priced at a much more affordable $2,961 (€2,586) per month.

Meanwhile, Luxembourg’s average is ten times higher than Turkey’s, at $441 (€385) per month.

Rents are equally staggering, with the average three-bed costing $3,017 (€2,634) in the Grand Duchy, compared to $2,599 (€2,269) in second-place Switzerland. Turkey is again the lowest in the OECD, at $372 (€324) per month.

How about something more affordable and nearby? Average rents and mortgages are much lower among the Grand Duchy’s neighbors – Belgium being on average the most affordable. Monthly rents are $1,224 (€1,069) and mortgage payments are $1,384 (€1,209).

Top 10 biggest price gaps

Rank Country Average rent $ (3 bedrooms) Monthly mortgage payment $ (est.) Difference between property price and rent
1 Luxemburg 3,017 4,558 51.1%
2 Latvia 582 830 42.5%
3 Slovakia 771 1,098 42.3%
4 Portugal 1,005 1,419 41.2%
5 Hungary 583 822 40.9%
6 Russia 746 1,045 40.1%
seven Czech Republic 861 1,205 40.0%
8 New Zealand 1,656 2,234 34.9%
9 Germany 1,414 1,887 33.5%
ten Canada 1,597 2,118 32.6%
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South Korea ranks 2nd among OECD countries for property tax to GDP ratio https://rglb.org/south-korea-ranks-2nd-among-oecd-countries-for-property-tax-to-gdp-ratio/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 15:14:48 +0000 https://rglb.org/south-korea-ranks-2nd-among-oecd-countries-for-property-tax-to-gdp-ratio/ South Korea ranked second among the members of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) for the ratio of property tax to gross domestic product (GDP) in 2020, with its growth of a year over year showing number one and ranking in terms of ratio climbing four notches from the previous year. According to […]]]>

South Korea ranked second among the members of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) for the ratio of property tax to gross domestic product (GDP) in 2020, with its growth of a year over year showing number one and ranking in terms of ratio climbing four notches from the previous year.

According to a recent analysis from the Paris-based organization, South Korea recorded 3.97 percent in the property tax ratio – in which the capital gains tax on home exchanges and of land occupies a dominant part – to the GDP from 2020.

Canada tops the list with a figure of 4.15 percent, followed by South Korea and France, which are tied for second.

Of the 38 members, the figure for Australia has not been included.

The OECD clarified that property tax includes “taxes on real estate or net wealth, taxes on the change in ownership of property by inheritance or gift and taxes on financial and capital transactions” .

Although South Korea remained in sixth place with 3.11% in 2019, the country saw its ratio increase by 0.86 percentage point in just one year, which was the highest growth in the OECD .

In addition, the property tax-to-GDP ratio has increased the fastest in terms of growth in three years since 2017, when it was 2.96%, ranking ninth. The ranking moved to seventh place with 3.09% in 2018.

During the period 2017-2020, South Korea overtook Greece, Israel, Belgium, Luxembourg, the United Kingdom and the United States.

South Korea posted an increase of 1.01 percentage point – the highest among members – over the three-year period. Some countries, including the United States, United Kingdom, Italy, Spain, Sweden, Mexico and Turkey, have seen this ratio decline.

Although Japan also recorded an increase in the corresponding period, its ratio only increased by 0.1 percentage point to reach 2.63% in 2020.

While the organization has yet to release the 2020 average for its 38 members, the average was 1.87% in 2017, 1.81% in 2018, and 1.8% in 2019.

In this trend, South Korea may become the country with the highest household burden on property taxes in the OECD, overtaking Canada in the upcoming analysis for 2021 or 2022.

Under the Moon Jae-in administration since May 2017, South Korea has focused a lot on the comprehensive property tax as part of its efforts to apply active taxation to multiple home owners and landowners.

Additionally, a large portion of homeowners in Seoul and some major cities have faced higher property taxes as a result of record house price growth over the past four years.

THE KOREA HERALD / ASIA INFORMATION NETWORK


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USD / CAD at 1.30? https://rglb.org/usd-cad-at-1-30/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 22:01:44 +0000 https://rglb.org/usd-cad-at-1-30/ Today’s US economic reports reminded investors of the lure of the dollar. The job market is strong and the Federal Reserve will actively cut stimulus this year, pushing rates higher. Ten-year Treasury bill yields topped 1.7%, tying a two-year high. According to the minutes of the last Federal Reserve meeting, many participants felt that the […]]]>

Today’s US economic reports reminded investors of the lure of the dollar. The job market is strong and the Federal Reserve will actively cut stimulus this year, pushing rates higher. Ten-year Treasury bill yields topped 1.7%, tying a two-year high. According to the minutes of the last Federal Reserve meeting, many participants felt that the balance sheet could be reduced at a faster pace and that the conditions for a rate hike could be in place sooner if inflation remains high. and whether the improvement in the labor market continues. After falling in December, oil prices have rebounded sharply over the past 3 weeks and the labor market is healthy, with ADP reporting its biggest increase in private payrolls last month since May. It was therefore not surprising that the dollar bulls kept control, with the greenback recovering its losses overnight against the Japanese yen and the euro. Commodity-linked currencies were the hardest hit by dollar gains and massive sell-offs of equities. The markets are finally considering the effects of rate hikes this year.

Meanwhile, attention is drawn to Friday’s jobs report. The publication of the non-manufacturing ISM is expected tomorrow and the employment component of this report is one of the strongest leading indicators for non-farm payrolls. With ADP up 807,000 in December, investors expect a strong report. If their point of view is reinforced by tomorrow’s ISM, we will see the greenback extend its gains to NFPs.

The weakest currency today was the Canadian dollar. Despite a sharp rise in building permits (nearly four times more than expected), the intoxicating real estate market could cool down as house prices rise at a slower pace. It’s a big week in North America, with the Canadian dollar being as much the center of attention as the greenback. The country’s trade balance is due to be released tomorrow along with labor market figures on Friday. Job growth is expected to slow significantly after the country created 153,000 jobs in November. USD / CAD is trading higher on expectations of stronger US job growth and weaker job growth in Canada. The restrictions are also back in Canada. A curfew has been announced for Quebec, restaurants can only offer take-out or delivery meals and gatherings are no longer allowed. Ontario has also closed indoor restaurants, limited capacity and reduced gatherings. These restrictions will slow the recovery and reduce demand for the loonie, putting the USD / CAD on a path towards 1.30.

European currencies recovered on Wednesday despite downward revisions to euro area PMIs. Infections are at record levels, but countries like Germany, France and Belgium are relaxing quarantine rules. In recent days, Belgium has exempted close contacts vaccinated from quarantine, France has shortened its isolation period for positive patients from 10 to 7 days and can end isolation after 5 days if they are negative without symptoms for 48 hours. Today, the German Ministry of Health also recommended reducing the quarantine period to 7 days instead of 14 days. This is more in line with advice from the US Center of Disease Control regarding a 5-day isolation for asymptomatic patients. The UK announced today that fully vaccinated travelers no longer need to submit a PCR test on arrival (a rapid negative within 48 hours is sufficient). Investors applaud these efforts to reopen the economy by pushing up the euro and pound sterling.


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Political scandals, spy stories and defense https://rglb.org/political-scandals-spy-stories-and-defense/ Mon, 03 Jan 2022 06:06:59 +0000 https://rglb.org/political-scandals-spy-stories-and-defense/ A year in review: political scandals, spy stories and defense 2021 in review Prime Minister’s plagiarism allegations, Luxembourg housing squeeze and links to spyware companies grabbed political headlines in 2021 Prime Minister’s plagiarism allegations, Luxembourg housing squeeze and links to spyware companies grabbed political headlines in 2021 Luxembourg’s links to a spyware company, the Prime […]]]>

A year in review: political scandals, spy stories and defense

2021 in review

Prime Minister’s plagiarism allegations, Luxembourg housing squeeze and links to spyware companies grabbed political headlines in 2021

Prime Minister’s plagiarism allegations, Luxembourg housing squeeze and links to spyware companies grabbed political headlines in 2021

Luxembourg’s links to a spyware company, the Prime Minister’s plagiarism allegations and a US extradition request for one of the former directors of the Grand Duchy’s national intelligence agency have all made headlines. politics last year.

Here’s a look at some of the biggest stories.

Circle of friends

As political life was to a large extent dominated by the pandemic, the largest opposition party, the Christian Democrats of the CSV, stood out for denouncing their then president, Frank Engel, for prosecution. of the country for a supposedly fictitious job and problems around social security contributions. This led to police searches of the CSV headquarters. Investigators then widened the circle to include more party members, including some politically aligned with the party denouncing Engel, who resigned his post.

In a surprisingly swift court process, Engel and the other defendants were acquitted of – among other things – fraud and forgery charges, and the prosecution decided not to appeal. However, damage has been done to the party, traditionally the most dominant force in national politics, which is now reaching historic lows in the polls.

NSO and Pegasus

Luxembourg has been at the center of the developing story of Israeli spyware company NSO, which has been linked to surveillance abuses by authoritarian governments and democracies as the Grand Duchy is home to several entities linked to NSO.

In a live interview with the Luxembourg Times, Prime Minister Xavier Bettel appeared to admit to having used the software, although his ministry later said he was talking about spyware in general, and not spyware in particular. Earlier this year, Foreign Minister Asselborn said there were nine NSO-related entities in the Grand Duchy, after initially saying he was only aware of two. A previous Amnesty International report from June showed that the number of Luxembourgish entities could be even higher.

Pressure mounts on NSO as the US Department of Commerce puts the company on its dreaded “entity list” and more and more revelations emerge about the software used on Polish opposition politicians and officials from the US State Department. NSO is reportedly considering stopping its spyware. Apple is also suing the company over its zero hacking technology deployed to enter Apple products.

In addition to the spyware revelations, the Luxembourg prosecution also attempted to retrieve information from the secure messaging application company Signal about users as part of a criminal investigation, which led to a brutal rebuttal of the law. company.

The extradition of spies

The former Luxembourg director of operations of the national intelligence agency SREL, Frank Schneider, was arrested in France near the Luxembourg border in April 2020 and is currently facing extradition to the United States for a crypto scam of several billion. Luxembourg does not interfere in the bilateral extradition between France and its ally on the other side of the Atlantic. The FBI even traveled to Nancy to congratulate the French police on her successful arrest.

Schneider is cited as a co-conspirator in US court documents in the OneCoin scam, run by “cryptoqueen” Ignatova, who is on the run. She is said to have defrauded customers around the world for more than $ 4 billion (3.5 billion euros).

Schneider, who is also accused in a Luxembourg court case over how former Prime Minister Jean-Claude Juncker handled intelligence services, now faces a new hearing in court in Nancy on January 19 after being released under electronic surveillance without bail, with an extradition decision then awaited.

A Luxembourg hours The investigation showed that Schneider had screened clients for the Luxembourg-based European Investment Bank with his private company Sandstone. Email exchanges on Wikileaks also showed that Schneider had previously sought contact with an Italian spyware company which Luxembourg later admitted to be a client, and which also made headlines for abuse. of the government.

Russia Today in German

Luxembourg has received a request from RT’s parent company, formerly known as Russia Today, to broadcast its new German-language channel, bypassing German law on state-funded banned channels. Government officials met with their German counterparts, including intelligence officers, to discuss the matter, and Luxembourg ultimately said it would not grant the license.

Currently, RT in German operates with a Serbian license to broadcast in German-speaking countries, but already faces many technical and legal obstacles.

Bettel’s plagiarism

Prime Minister Xavier Bettel plagiarized much of his postgraduate research thesis, according to a Reporter.lu investigation, and his former university is currently investigating the allegations.


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RTL Today – Covid, the crashes and the Ducalcoaster: RTL Today’s most read articles in 2021 https://rglb.org/rtl-today-covid-the-crashes-and-the-ducalcoaster-rtl-todays-most-read-articles-in-2021/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 07:51:02 +0000 https://rglb.org/rtl-today-covid-the-crashes-and-the-ducalcoaster-rtl-todays-most-read-articles-in-2021/ We look back on a roller coaster year in the news, dominated by the pandemic, but also characterized by devastating flooding, soaring house prices and a children’s TV show that raises eyebrows. January The year started with former Princess Tessy of Nassau who announced her engagement to Swiss businessman Frank Floessel. From the sublime, we […]]]>

We look back on a roller coaster year in the news, dominated by the pandemic, but also characterized by devastating flooding, soaring house prices and a children’s TV show that raises eyebrows.

January

The year started with former Princess Tessy of Nassau who announced her engagement to Swiss businessman Frank Floessel.

From the sublime, we quickly turned to the ridiculous, with the news from Denmark of the premiere of an animated children’s television show that revolved around the life of John Dillermand – the man with “the longest penis in the world. world”.

In the pandemic news, at the end of January, all eyes were on Belgium following its announcement of a ban on non-essential travel to and from the country. The question that most agitates our readers? “Can I go to IKEA? “

At home, however, the news was better, with non-essential stores reopening earlier in the month, although hospitality remained closed.

February

February began with more heartwarming news from the former princess, with Tessy announcing that a baby was on the way.

Mid-month, a major fire broke out in a building on Place d’Armes in Luxembourg City. About fifty firefighters were mobilized to control the fire, visible from far away. Fortunately, the injuries were limited to two people who inhaled smoke.

In the Covid news, as the demand for hand sanitizers increased, the Luxembourg environment agency found that three quarters of disinfectants on the market did not comply with Luxembourg law.

Confusion over masks also reigned in Luxembourg primary schools, with inconsistent rules for 5 and 6 year olds requiring a clarification from the Ministry of Education.

March

March was a month of contrasts. On the one hand, many welcomed the publication of a UN report according to which Luxembourg is the eighth happiest country in the world. In contrast, a fatal accident on the N7 highlighted the dangers of driving on the country’s roads.

From a pandemic perspective, there was cause for optimism as the government simultaneously launched phases 5a and 2 of the vaccination campaign, thereby accelerating the rollout of vaccines. But there was also a call for more patience, as Prime Minister Xavier Bettel and Health Minister Paulette Lenert delayed the reopening of the hotel sector.

April

This month it was all about real estate, with news that house prices had climbed 17% in the last year alone, with an average house in the Grand Duchy costing € 1.3m. A vivid example of high prices was provided by this gem, for just 24,000 euros per square meter you could move into a completely renovated and modernized apartment in the heart of Luxembourg City!

As the vaccine rollout continued to expand, we all received good news as the first customers were allowed to return to the terraces of cafes and restaurants in the Grand Duchy.

Can

After learning last month about how high house prices can be, we found out in May that there are still locations in Luxembourg that are more or less affordable. Continuing the theme of learning, we also got the story of Prime Minister Xavier Bettel, finding out that fame runs in his blood – his ancestor is classical music composer Sergei Rachmaninoff.

In pandemic news, the final phase of the vaccination campaign has begun with vaccines becoming available to all residents between the ages of 16 and 54. The reception was also opened more, customers being allowed to enter the premises.

June

We enthusiastically returned to Tessy’s pregnancy story in June, enjoying the breakout of a gallery of Tessy and Frank’s baby shower photos – featuring papier-mâché storks and all. We followed the story with interest throughout the rest of the year, with Tessy getting married in July in Switzerland, then welcoming a baby boy, Theodor, into the world in August.

The onset of summer has seen all manner of creepy creatures and critters wake up from their winter hibernation. Oak processionary caterpillars, mosquitoes and chiggers were back in the Grand Duchy. Our report included some helpful steps to minimize the risk of allergic reactions or skin irritation.

The summer also saw a further easing of Covid restrictions, with the lifting of the curfew and the resumption of nightlife. The arrival of the Delta variant in the UK, however, brought bad news for some, as Luxembourg introduced a quarantine and mandatory testing for arrivals from Britain.

July

Tragedy and devastation hit this part of the world in mid-July, with flooding raging in Luxembourg, Germany, Belgium and the Netherlands. We have kept you updated on the rapidly evolving situation with our live coverage.

Meanwhile, tragedy was averted in Bertrange, when a driver got stranded at a level crossing but managed to escape his vehicle before a train crashed into it.

Thinking back to the pandemic to date, a Der Spiegel Comparison of the data revealed that Luxembourg overcame the pandemic second in the world, with only Finland balancing the economy and health more effectively.

If the Prime Minister thought he could relax a bit, however, he was not so lucky. July was also the month Bettel fell seriously ill with Covid – she was admitted to hospital with difficulty breathing. After a few days of treatment, he recovered and was able to leave the hospital and return to work.

August

August saw no respite in what was turning out to be a particularly hectic year. Earlier this month, a man was shot dead in Ettelbruck after attacking police officers with a knife. He succumbed to his injuries.

At the end of the month, a report of Reporter.lu and the Nepalese time revealed the atrocious conditions of some Nepalese catering workers in the Grand Duchy, with interviewees detailing the allegations of violent abuse and poor living conditions.

If there was one story that continued to dominate, it was Covid vaccinations. A 22-year-old student in Italy became an unexpected internet sensation this month after tattooing his Covid certificate barcode on his arm.

We also revealed how, while helping the world fight the Covid-19 pandemic, pharmaceutical companies have raked in billions from jabs.

September

Another fatal crash made headlines in September, when a 20-year-old woman died in Esch-Belval after the driver lost control of her SUV, causing it to tip over in a roundabout.

In lighter news, the Prime Minister made headlines again after being spotted with Health Minister Paulette Lenert on a roller coaster ride at Fun Um Glacis.

Vaccines also grabbed the headlines this month. A new Covid law has been passed in the Chamber of Deputies, making the CovidCheck mandatory for anyone over the age of six. During the parliamentary debate on the new law, Bettel denounced a “minority” of the population which “forces the majority” to live with restrictions instead of “participating in the collective effort”.

October

Showing an odd knack for staying in the headlines, though not necessarily for all the right reasons, Prime Minister Bettel once again made headlines when reports revealed that he may have been committing crime. plagiarism in his university thesis.

Our attention quickly turned to other issues, however, with the announcement that Luxembourg would be the first country in the EU to legalize domestic production and consumption of cannabis.

And of course, it wouldn’t be a month in the Grand Duchy without more housing news. We spoke to a housing market researcher, who said pressure on land and real estate prices is approaching a “tipping point.”

October also saw the start of the fourth wave of coronavirus in Luxembourg, with the government going even further to increase vaccinations with a tightening of the CovidCheck regime to prevent unvaccinated people from using self-tests to enter reception facilities or Recreation.

November

This month, you finally got to meet us in person! The International Bazaar returned after a pandemic hiatus, and we had quizzes, good discussions, and general silliness galore.

It was also the month where we took the time to make sure our plans for the future were in order, as we learned all about how to get a good retirement in Luxembourg.

There was even more news on the Covid vaccine, as the government recommended booster shots for everyone aged 18 or older. As concerns about the pandemic continued, measures were further reinforced with a 2G diet (vaccinated or recovered) put in place for leisure and hospitality, and a 3G diet (vaccinated, recovered or tested) announced. for an introduction to the workplace from January.

December

There was no escape from the Covid news as we ended the year with the announcement that from Christmas day, a 2G + diet (boosted or vaccinated plus rapid test) and a curfew at 11 p.m. were to be introduced in the hotel sector.

Earlier this month, the imposition of Covid-19 measures also sparked violent protests in the streets of Luxembourg City, with protesters clashing with police at the Christmas market. Protests continued throughout the month, although the majority of protesters remained peaceful.

Yet despite the continued uproar and restrictions linked to the coronavirus pandemic, figures have revealed that on a per capita basis Luxembourg remains the richest country in the world.

Finally, we looked at what 2022 has in store for the Grand Duchy, by breaking down the next changes in taxes, housing, transport … However, as one speaker noted, we unfortunately cannot predict the time that it will do for the coming year. But for those who follow us on Facebook, we’ll do our best to keep you informed and entertained with our irreverent (some would say witty!) Weather messages.

Wishing you a safe, happy and prosperous year 2022, on behalf of the entire RTL Today team!


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More and more people are opting for home loans https://rglb.org/more-and-more-people-are-opting-for-home-loans/ Sat, 25 Dec 2021 18:00:00 +0000 https://rglb.org/more-and-more-people-are-opting-for-home-loans/ Sun 26 Dec 2021 00:00 Last update on: Sun 26 Dec 2021 14:33 Visitors inquire about offers at a Bank Asia booth at the current REHAB-2021 trade fair organized by the Bangladesh Real Estate and Housing Association (REHAB) at the Bangabandhu International Conference Center in Dhaka yesterday. The fair will run until tomorrow. Photo: Palash […]]]>

Visitors inquire about offers at a Bank Asia booth at the current REHAB-2021 trade fair organized by the Bangladesh Real Estate and Housing Association (REHAB) at the Bangabandhu International Conference Center in Dhaka yesterday. The fair will run until tomorrow. Photo: Palash Khan

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Visitors inquire about offers at a Bank Asia booth at the current REHAB-2021 trade fair organized by the Bangladesh Real Estate and Housing Association (REHAB) at the Bangabandhu International Conference Center in Dhaka yesterday. The fair will run until tomorrow. Photo: Palash Khan

Banks and Non-Bank Financial Institutions (NBFIs) believe that the potential mortgage lending activity in the housing and real estate sector is growing rapidly thanks to the expansion of the affluent class and the ability to buy growing population.

Bankers and associate officials attending an ongoing five-day “REHAB 2021 Fair” at the Bangabandhu International Conference Center told the Daily Star yesterday.

For all the latest news, follow the Daily Star’s Google News channel.

Although the data claims could not be immediately substantiated, the conversation revealed that financial institutions now have portfolios of potential disbursements five times larger than they did five years ago.

A total of 13 banks and NBFI are participating in the fair, where a maximum of Tk 2 crore can be used as a home loan. The land or apartment remains mortgaged until the loan is repaid.

Rahat Jamil, head of distribution at IPDC Finance, said they started offering home loans in 2016 with Tk 100 crore and that figure reached Tk 686 crore this year.

“We provide home loans to clients who have a minimum sustainable monthly income of Tk 40,000,” he noted.

The IPDC offers 7.99% interest-rate home loans marking the fair and already five clients have secured cash loan approvals, he said.

Mr Sirajus Saleken, head of mortgage management and developer relations at Brac Bank, said they were offering 7.5% mortgage interest at the fair.

He said that employees, businessmen and teachers with monthly incomes between Tk 20,000 and Tk 1.30 lakh could qualify for a home loan.

According to him, landowners who want to construct a building or a sheet metal structure could benefit from a loan from the Brac Bank.

“We provide home loans to clients of reputable companies whose projects are under construction, while clients of ordinary developers can get loans after the apartments are registered,” he noted.

Saleken sees huge potential for mortgage lender products as the number of loan seekers has increased alongside the development of the real estate industry with increasing spending capacity of the population.

Sujit Saha, director of business development at Standard Chartered Bank, said clients with a minimum monthly income of Tk 78,000 can qualify for home loans of up to Tk 2 crore for up to 25 years.

The bank, like others, provides 70 percent of the value of the assets in the form of a loan, he said.

Saha said they were giving home loans at a 9% interest rate but offered 1.5% cash back marking the fair.

He said the number of home loan clients has grown steadily and significantly over the past five years.

Saha said mortgages are less risky because proposals are approved through proper assessment of clients’ income.

Mohammad Didar Hossain, senior loan officer at Delta Brac Housing Finance Corporation, said they give ad hoc approvals to loan proposals from apartment buyers.

He said they received a number of inquiries from customers.

They also cut the interest rate to 7.5 percent from the fair’s 7.99 percent mark and also offered a 50 percent discount on processing fees.

According to him, they can provide a maximum of Tk 6 crore depending on the client’s wallet.

Md Kamruzzaman, head of the retail banking division of Mutual Trust Bank, said they provide loans at 7.5% interest rate to clients with permanent income of Tk 40,000 or more. .

They were a little different, giving loans to clients up to the age of 70. But it also depended on financial conditions. Almost all banks and NBFI consider an age limit of 65 for granting loans.


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Eurobites: Tele2 ready to deploy 5G in Latvia https://rglb.org/eurobites-tele2-ready-to-deploy-5g-in-latvia/ Fri, 17 Dec 2021 12:42:47 +0000 https://rglb.org/eurobites-tele2-ready-to-deploy-5g-in-latvia/ Also in today’s EMEA regional roundup: Ofcom bans locked handsets; Hyperoptic participates in the smart home pilot; Telesign goes public. Tele2 says it now has everything in place to start a nationwide 5G rollout and 4G upgrade in Latvia after bagging 2x10MHz in the first part of the country’s 700MHz spectrum auction. The operator had […]]]>

Also in today’s EMEA regional roundup: Ofcom bans locked handsets; Hyperoptic participates in the smart home pilot; Telesign goes public.

  • Tele2 says it now has everything in place to start a nationwide 5G rollout and 4G upgrade in Latvia after bagging 2x10MHz in the first part of the country’s 700MHz spectrum auction. The operator had previously partnered with Bite to explore the possibility of a shared mobile network and spectrum deal in Latvia and Lithuania, but as the partnership was only partially approved by regulatory authorities, the two companies have decided to end the agreement.
  • From today UK mobile phone companies are banned from selling locked handsets, under new rules set by communications regulator Ofcom. The regulator’s own research found that more than a third of people who decided not to switch networks said having to unlock a handset deterred them from moving, while nearly half of customers who tried to unlock their phone encounter problems such as long delays or loss of service. The new rules also limit telephony and broadband contracts to a maximum of two years.
  • Hyperoptic is participating in an interesting-sounding pilot program, which sees the UK altnet providing a second low-bandwidth connection to every house on a new social housing development in Wales specifically to support smart home equipment. By running the applications on a separate line ?? which is not accessible by the tenant ?? the smart home service can be managed completely separately by the housing or smart home technology provider.
  • The European Union’s antitrust authorities are about to give the green light to the plan to take over Kustomer by Facebook, the awkwardly named supplier of CRM (Customer Relationship Manager) software, according to anonymous sources cited by Reuters. A final and official decision on the deal is expected by January 28.
  • TeleSign, the digital identity specialist which is a subsidiary of Belgian Proximus, goes public through a merger with North Atlantic Acquisition Corporation (NAAC), an “ad hoc acquisition company” (or a blank check company, if you prefer). The deal, worth $ 1.3 billion, is expected to be finalized in the second quarter of 2022.

    ?? Paul Rainford, Associate Editor, Europe, Light Reading


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    World Habitat Awards 2021 the winning projects https://rglb.org/world-habitat-awards-2021-the-winning-projects/ Fri, 17 Dec 2021 07:34:57 +0000 https://rglb.org/world-habitat-awards-2021-the-winning-projects/ The World Habitat organization is committed to the fundamental right to safe and secure housing. For this reason, it works with UN-Habitat, the United Nations Human Settlements Program, to ensure a better urban future. The World Habitat Awards are one of the tools used to recognize the efforts made in this direction. The two gold […]]]>

    The World Habitat organization is committed to the fundamental right to safe and secure housing. For this reason, it works with UN-Habitat, the United Nations Human Settlements Program, to ensure a better urban future. The World Habitat Awards are one of the tools used to recognize the efforts made in this direction.
    The two gold winners of the 2021 World Habitat Awards are Presentation of community land trusts in continental Europe project in Brussels, and the Housing monitor project carried out by the Public Works Studio in Beirut.
    The first project tackles the affordable housing crisis in Brussels, caused by rising house prices and a lack of social housing, which left low-income people with no choice but to rent poor quality housing or to leave the city. The project is managed by Community Land Trust Brussels (CLTB), which advocates the use of the Community Land Trust model in Belgium to address this growing problem. Houses are sold 30 to 50 percent below market prices and the cost of the house is subsidized based on the family’s ability to pay. So far, CLTB has completed five projects, housing 450 people in 103 housing units, while four more projects are currently under preparation.
    Housing monitor, on the other hand, is a Beirut-based housing rights project managed by the Public Works Studio. It provides support to people who report housing violations and injustices such as evictions, having resolved 472 cases to date. Public Works Studio responds to the housing needs of individuals by providing them with access to legal and social services, raising awareness among vulnerable groups, including low-income Lebanese residents, refugees and migrant domestic workers. As the first project of its kind in the Middle East and North Africa region, Housing Monitor gives these communities a voice to claim their basic housing rights and campaign for a more just and equitable society. The two Gold Award winners receive £ 10,000 and the opportunity to participate in international development activities.
    In addition to these two Gold Award winners, World Habitat also presents two silver prizes and four bronze prizes. The first Silver Award goes to “Integrated community development for poverty reductionin Bhutan, which aims to improve the living conditions of isolated communities through the integration of housing, sanitation, livelihoods and food security. The second Silver Award winner, on the other hand, is the “Safe Homes for Women in Hull“in the UK. This project is testing a homeownership model for charities to provide housing with integrated services to women and their children who have experienced domestic violence.
    Sanitary module in Argentina, winner of the Bronze Award, addresses the lack of hygiene services in informal settlements by installing bathroom and kitchen modules in homes, as well as providing families with hygiene kits. A bronze prize was also awarded to Arkom Indonesia, the organization that, following the 2018 tsunami in Palu Bay, helped the local community manage their recovery and reconstruction as well as a safe resettlement near the sea which is their main source of income. Also in reference to a natural disaster, another bronze medalist is the reconstruction of housing after the earthquake project in Mexico that uses natural materials and vernacular techniques, combined with a participatory, inclusive and diverse design, to fight housing poverty among vulnerable groups. Finally, the last bronze medalist is the MiCASiTA: Progressive funding for affordable housing expansion in the United States, a phased construction project in Texas that offers low-cost mortgages that adapt and grow as families expand and expand their homes.
    The award-winning projects illustrate the wide range of housing challenges facing people around the world, from the impact of the climate emergency to housing rights to affordability. But, as David Ireland, Managing Director of World Habitat says, “there are solutions and steps that can be taken to ensure that safe and secure housing can be a reality for everyone – rather than an aspiration. “

    Christiane Bürklein

    Global Housing Prices 2021
    Images: see captions
    Find out more: https://world-habitat.org/world-habitat-awards/


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    New Dutch coalition pledges to spend big on sweeping reforms | Business https://rglb.org/new-dutch-coalition-pledges-to-spend-big-on-sweeping-reforms-business/ Wed, 15 Dec 2021 14:40:02 +0000 https://rglb.org/new-dutch-coalition-pledges-to-spend-big-on-sweeping-reforms-business/ THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) – Leaders of four political parties poised to join forces in the next Dutch ruling coalition on Wednesday pledged to tackle thorny issues such as climate change and housing shortages and to strengthen education and a health system that has been stretched almost to the point of breaking by the COVID-19 […]]]>

    THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) – Leaders of four political parties poised to join forces in the next Dutch ruling coalition on Wednesday pledged to tackle thorny issues such as climate change and housing shortages and to strengthen education and a health system that has been stretched almost to the point of breaking by the COVID-19 pandemic.

    They also pledged to work to regain public confidence in government and politics which has been eroded by scandals, polarization, frustration in parts of society over the pandemic measures and over the past nine years. months it took for the parties to reach the coalition agreement after a month of March. 17 elections.

    Acting Prime Minister Mark Rutte, who is now due to start a fourth term early next year, said the coalition would seek to work with “society and with our political colleagues” in parliament to implement reforms.

    The plans that include tax cuts, nearly free child care for working parents, a return of scholarships for higher education students, labor market reforms and a plan to build around 100,000 new homes each year will cost billions in this country long known for its frugality.

    The policies were outlined in a 47-page document titled “Caring for One another, Looking to the Future”.

    One of its main objectives is to fight the climate crisis and polluting emissions, in particular the ambition to reduce carbon emissions by at least 55% by 2030 in order to become climate neutral by 2050.

    As part of climate policy, the coalition announced that it would set up a climate and energy transition fund of 35 billion euros ($ 39 billion) for the coming decade, appoint a minister of climate and energy and would implement measures for the construction of two new nuclear power plants as well as to stimulate the production of renewable energy.

    Climate group Greenpeace welcomed parts of the plan, but said more was needed, including concrete steps to reduce carbon emissions. He said he was “disappointed to see the focus on nuclear power”, but expressed skepticism about the nuclear plan coming to fruition.

    Coalition parties also pledged to invest in all levels of the education system, tackle inequalities and intolerance in society, and tackle organized crime amid fears about the growing power of drug gangs. . The problem was highlighted during the summer with the murder of famous campaign journalist Peter R. De Vries on a street in Amsterdam.

    While parties pledged to invest in higher wages for healthcare workers, opposition parties criticized them for what they called long-term healthcare budget cuts.

    On foreign policy, the coalition said it would work for a “more decisive, economically stronger, greener and more secure” European Union with more transparent decision-making. He also wants to promote international cooperation, strengthen the transatlantic alliance and fight against international espionage.

    The document marked the beginning of the end of a long process to form a new government.

    Rutte is expected to lead a coalition made up of his conservative People’s Party for Freedom and Democracy, as well as the pro-European D66, the center-right Christian Democrat Appeal and the centrist Christian Union. Together, they have a slim majority in the lower house of the Dutch parliament, which has 150 seats, but are in the minority in the upper house.

    Rutte, 54, has already led three coalitions and is set to become the oldest leader in the Netherlands despite barely surviving a vote of no confidence in parliament in April.

    His fourth cabinet will be made up of the same parties as his third, which ended his term in early January when all ministers resigned to take political responsibility for a scandal involving the country’s tax department falsely branding thousands of parents as fraudsters. claiming family allowances.

    Rutte is now expected to be appointed to oversee the allocation of Cabinet portfolios. This process will likely last until early next year, when the new government can be officially installed.

    The presentation of the deal came just under nine months after the general election in March, making coalition talks the longest in Dutch history. But they were still well below the record set in neighboring Belgium. In December 2011, Belgium concocted a government after 541 days of negotiations.

    Johan Remkes, one of the officials who led the talks, said the process needed to be looked at.

    “The period leading up to the substantive negotiations has been excessively long,” he said. “Once the dust settles, it requires a solid assessment.”

    Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.


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    Belgium prevents migrants from seeking asylum and makes them sleep restless again https://rglb.org/belgium-prevents-migrants-from-seeking-asylum-and-makes-them-sleep-restless-again/ Mon, 13 Dec 2021 18:11:00 +0000 https://rglb.org/belgium-prevents-migrants-from-seeking-asylum-and-makes-them-sleep-restless-again/ Tuesday, December 14, 2021, 7:11 a.m.Press release: Euro Med Monitor Hundreds of migrants sleep in front of the only registration center in Brussels to lodge their asylum applications and find shelter, but the Belgian accommodation system seems overwhelmed and unable to enforce, once again, their right to welcome and protection. For almost a month, every […]]]>

    Hundreds of migrants sleep in front of the only registration center in Brussels to lodge their asylum applications and find shelter, but the Belgian accommodation system seems overwhelmed and unable to enforce, once again, their right to welcome and protection.

    For almost a month, every morning, between 150 and 200 people have lined up in front of the Fedasil agency, the federal reception agency for asylum seekers, in downtown Brussels to submit their asylum application and find overnight accommodation. . Many began to spend the night there and sleep on the sidewalk to make up for their place in the queue, among rats and trash, in the cold.

    Belgium has more than 28,000 reception places in total, in 79 collective centers and individual housing, but the network seems entirely saturated.

    According to Fedasil, this can be explained in particular by the increase in asylum requests, the resettlement of Syrian refugees, the lengthening of the length of stay in reception centers, and the repatriation mission from Afghanistan as well as summer flooding and the reservation of certain places as isolation sites for possible COVID-19 infections.

    Yet all contributing factors were predictable and treatable, with the most recent still occurring several months ago, highlighting a system incapable of flexibility, anticipation and ultimately credibility.

    Fedasil staff stopped working in October for several days to protest against “the inaction of our political authorities.And recurring cuts to services when arrivals decrease.

    This whole situation is cyclical, structural and predictable.

    The lack of reception capacity is a recurring concern in Belgium. The same reception center has already encountered significant difficulties in 2018 and 2019, when the government set a limited number of asylum requests per day, then deemed in contradiction with national and international law by the Council of State. After this judgment, all asylum seekers were accommodated on the same day they lodged their asylum application. However, in January 2020, the government again decided to limit the right to reception.

    “It’s not a question of resources, but of priorities. There are no unforeseeable emergencies or massive arrivals now, it is clear that the problem is structural, ”said Michela Pugliese, migration and asylum researcher at Euro-Med Monitor,“ Everywhere in Europe, States avoid looking at the big picture, all are linked by neglect and lack of long-term vision, especially vis-à-vis asylum seekers and the homeless. When you manage a systematic problem with emergency solutions and time-based concessions, rather than an unlimited and constant provision of rights, it is inevitable. “

    The consequences of mismanagement and a lack of planning are disastrous for the physical and psychological well-being of the people that states should protect, but also for the credibility of the Belgian authorities and the European Union as well. Indeed, the housing situation goes beyond Belgium, with many European countries reporting similar problems, such as France and the Netherlands.

    Euro-Med Monitor calls on Belgium to guarantee all applicants for international protection healthcare and a decent standard of living at all times; ensure their right to material reception conditions as soon as they submit their asylum application, in accordance with art. 20 (6) of the Reception Conditions Directive; and to exercise their right to request international protection as soon as possible, in accordance with Article 6 of the recast Asylum Procedures Directive.

    Euro-Med Monitor calls on the European Commission to ensure respect for European asylum law and in particular the Reception Conditions Directive, and to take appropriate enforcement action when concerns and systematic violations are identified.

    © Scoop Media


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