Belgium housing – RGLB http://rglb.org/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 08:26:20 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://rglb.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T174556.459-150x150.png Belgium housing – RGLB http://rglb.org/ 32 32 Ukrainian refugees “ordered to leave Brussels homes” https://rglb.org/ukrainian-refugees-ordered-to-leave-brussels-homes/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 08:26:20 +0000 https://rglb.org/ukrainian-refugees-ordered-to-leave-brussels-homes/ Ukrainian refugees in Brussels are being told to leave their homes because their hosts no longer want them there, says Alina Kokhanko-Parandii. The 32-year-old arrived from kyiv, with her mother and baby daughter, in Brussels almost exactly three months ago. She has since found herself working as a liaison between the Brussels government and other […]]]>

Ukrainian refugees in Brussels are being told to leave their homes because their hosts no longer want them there, says Alina Kokhanko-Parandii.

The 32-year-old arrived from kyiv, with her mother and baby daughter, in Brussels almost exactly three months ago.

She has since found herself working as a liaison between the Brussels government and other Ukrainians as part of the city’s broader effort to include refugees in the decision-making and problem-solving process. .

“We have a situation where people want to go on vacation and they don’t want Ukrainians to stay at home,” she told EUobserver on Monday June 20.

“They want them to leave their homes and we know there are Ukrainians on the streets,” she said, noting that some end up sleeping at the Gare du Midi in central Brussels.

Besides an acute housing crisis that will only get worse, Kokhanko-Parandii said the Belgian administration and its many municipal communes in Brussels are too slow and cumbersome.

Belgian landlords also do not want to rent apartments to Ukrainians because their temporary protected status expires in March next year.

Typical Belgian rental contracts often run for three, six or nine years. Other owners are also reluctant to receive installments from the Brussels public center for social assistance, also known as CPAS.

Ariane, a special transit point for arriving Ukrainians run by the Flemish Red Cross in the wealthiest Brussels neighborhood of Woluwe-Saint-Lambert, is said to be in dire conditions.

Some find themselves stuck in the center for weeks, unable to register in order to secure their rights, as guaranteed by the European directive on temporary protection.

Kokhanko-Parandii said some Ukrainians are also struggling to adapt.

“You come here and you just have to start over from the beginning,” she said.

Kokhanko-Parandii is not alone in her quest to solve problems.

Among others, Ekaterina Clifford, a 47-year-old Russian who has lived in Brussels for four years.

“No one expected to house families for so long, for some people it’s also just expensive,” she said.

According to city officials, a large portion of Brussels residents spend around 50% of their monthly income on rent alone.

Clifford said volunteers across Belgium were working overtime to find accommodation for Ukrainians so “they don’t end up on the streets”.

The problems, and others, have baffled the authorities who are trying to iron out all the difficulties.

Housing issues

Pierre Verbeeren is one of them. He is also coordinator of the Brussels government for Ukraine.

He said Brussels is currently hosting some 8,000 Ukrainian refugees, a figure that is expected to rise to around 12,000 before the end of the year.

“The main problem is housing,” he said.

The plan to solve it includes turning office space into collective housing units for refugees, an idea that could later be used to tackle an acute homelessness crisis in the city.

But Verbeeren notes that such decisions are not made without first involving the Ukrainians, an unprecedented approach in Brussels.

“The first principle is ‘nothing about Ukraine without Ukrainians,'” he said.

“We include Ukrainians and beneficiaries of temporary protection in the whole decision-making process, in all the places we discuss in Ukraine,” he said.

This includes setting up working groups dealing with areas such as private housing, education, employment and health.

The heads of cabinet of all the Brussels ministers, the chairs of the working groups, as well as the Ukrainian representatives, then all sit down together in a global task force to deal with the problems.

But he concedes that the situation remains frustrating.

“The people of Brussels who host Ukrainians are fed up with the whole administration, because it’s too complex,” he said.

“Citizen solidarity is perceived as a failure of the state for many people,” he added.

He noted that efforts are underway to create synergy between institutional support, ordinary people hosting refugees and community outreach.

“It’s something new, and it’s something difficult, and it’s not a hit yet. So let’s be clear, it’s not a hit yet,” he said.

The approach taken by the Brussels regional government aims to integrate Ukrainians without creating double standards for others also in need while providing information to as many people as possible, he said.

United Nations Refugee Agency

It is a strategy that also relies on the support of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and its agent, Alphonse Munyameza, who works with Verbeeren.

“They really took the UNHCR handbook on community engagement,” he said, referring to the city’s decision to involve Ukrainians.

He said people like Ukrainian refugee Kokhanko-Parandii and Russian national Clifford had been designated as a special contact person or “spoc”.

Spocs meet with UNHCR once or twice a week to provide the agency with an overview of what is going on.

“We try to ensure that the community is not only informed, but also responsive to the needs of the people,” he said.

This article was updated on June 23 to clarify that Kokhanko-Parandii only works with the Commune Commission Communautaire.

Disclosure. The left-wing group in the European Parliament had invited EUobserver on a field visit to Brussels to discuss the refugee issue, alongside MEPs Cornelia Ernst, Malin Bjork and Anne-Sophie Pelletier

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Global Smart Grid Technology Market (2022 to 2027) https://rglb.org/global-smart-grid-technology-market-2022-to-2027/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 13:30:00 +0000 https://rglb.org/global-smart-grid-technology-market-2022-to-2027/ DUBLIN, June 21, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — The report “Global Smart Grid Technology Market (2022-2027) by Component, Application, Geography, Competitive Analysis and Covid-19 Impact with Ansoff Analysis” has been added to from ResearchAndMarkets.com offer. Research and Markets Logo The global Smart Grid technology market is estimated at $53.14 billion in 2022 and should reach $117.21 billion […]]]>

DUBLIN, June 21, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — The report “Global Smart Grid Technology Market (2022-2027) by Component, Application, Geography, Competitive Analysis and Covid-19 Impact with Ansoff Analysis” has been added to from ResearchAndMarkets.com offer.

Research and Markets Logo

The global Smart Grid technology market is estimated at $53.14 billion in 2022 and should reach $117.21 billion by 2027, growing at a CAGR of 17.14%.

Market dynamics are forces that are impacting pricing and stakeholder behaviors in the global Smart Grid Technology market. These forces create price signals that result from changes in the supply and demand curves for a given product or service. The forces of market dynamics can be related to macro-economic and micro-economic factors. There are dynamic market forces other than price, demand and supply. Human emotions can also drive decisions, influence the market and create price signals.

As market dynamics impact supply and demand curves, policymakers aim to determine how best to use various financial tools to stem various strategies aimed at accelerating growth and reducing risk.

Company Profiles

The report provides a detailed analysis of competitors in the market. It covers the analysis of financial performance of listed companies in the market. The report also offers detailed information about recent development and competitive scenario of the companies. Some of the companies covered in this report are ABB, Aclara Power-Line Systems, C3 AI, Cisco Systems, Eaton, etc.

Countries studied

  • America (Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Peru, United StatesRest of the Americas)

  • Europe (Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Russia, Spain, Sweden, Swiss, UKRest of Europe)

  • Middle East and Africa (Egypt, Israel, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, United Arab Emiratesrest of the MEA)

  • Asia Pacific (Australia, Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Thailand, TaiwanRest of Asia Pacific)

Competitive Quadrant

The report includes Competitive Quadrant, a proprietary tool to analyze and assess the position of companies based on their industry position score and market performance score. The tool uses various factors to classify players into four categories. Some of these factors considered for analysis are financial performance over the past 3 years, growth strategies, innovation score, new product launches, investments, market share growth, etc

Ansoff analysis

  • The report presents a detailed analysis of the Ansoff matrix for the global smart grid technology market. Ansoff Matrix, also known as Product/Market Expansion Grid, is a strategic tool used to design business growth strategies. The matrix can be used to assess approaches in four strategies viz. Market development, market penetration, product development and diversification. The matrix is ​​also used for risk analysis to understand the risk associated with each approach.

  • The report analyzes the global Smart Grid Technology market using the Ansoff Matrix to provide the best approaches a company can take to improve its position in the market.

  • Based on the SWOT analysis done on the industry and industry players, the analyst has designed appropriate strategies for market growth.

Why buy this report?

  • The report offers a comprehensive assessment of the global smart grid technology market. The report includes in-depth qualitative analysis, verifiable data from authentic sources, and market size projections. Projections are calculated using proven research methodologies.

  • The report has been compiled through extensive primary and secondary research. The main research is done through interviews, surveys and observations of renowned personnel in the industry.

  • The report includes in-depth market analysis using Porter’s 5 forces model and Ansoff’s matrix. Additionally, the impact of Covid-19 on the market is also presented in the report.

  • The report also includes the regulatory scenario in the industry, which will help you to make an informed decision. The report discusses the major regulatory bodies and major rules and regulations imposed on this industry across various geographies.

  • The report also contains competitive analysis using Positioning Quadrants, the analyst’s proprietary competitive positioning tool.

Main topics covered:

1 Description of the report

2 Research methodology

3 Executive summary

4 Market dynamics
4.1 Drivers
4.1.1 Improved network reliability and effective fault response
4.1.2 Need for careful analysis and better efficiency of smart grid
4.1.3 Modernizing Aging Network Infrastructure
4.2 Constraints
4.2.1 Reluctance due to aging electricity infrastructure
4.2.2 High Installation Cost of Smart Grids
4.3 Opportunities
4.3.1 Varied Technological Advancements in Communications Technologies
4.3.2 Ongoing Smart City Projects in Developing Regions
4.4 Challenges
4.4.1 Inadequate data storage and management

5 Market Analysis
5.1 Regulatory scenario
5.2 Porter’s Five Forces Analysis
5.3 Impact of COVID-19
5.4 Ansoff matrix analysis

6 Global Smart Grid Technology Market, By Component
6.1 Presentation
6.2 Material
6.2.1 Smart meters
6.2.2 Sensors
6.2.3 Programmable logic controllers
6.3 Services
6.3.1 Consulting
6.3.2 Deployment and integration
6.3.3 Support and maintenance
6.4 Software
6.4.1 Advanced metering infrastructure
6.4.2 Smart Grid Distribution Management
6.4.3 Smart Grid network management
6.4.4 Network Asset Management
6.4.5 Billing and customer information system
6.4.6 Smart Grid Security
6.4.7 Automation of substations

7 Global Smart Grid Technology Market, By Application
7.1 Presentation
7.2 Consumption
7.3 Distribution
7.4 Generation
7.5 Transmission

8 Americas Smart Grid Technology Market
8.1 Presentation
8.2 Argentina
8.3 Brazil
8.4 Canada
8.5 Chile
8.6 Colombia
8.7 Mexico
8.8 Peru
8.9 United States
8.10 Rest of the Americas

9 Europe smart grid technology market
9.1 Presentation
9.2 Austria
9.3 Belgium
9.4 Denmark
9.5 Finland
9.6 France
9.7 Germany
9.8 Italy
9.9 Netherlands
9.10 Norway
9.11 Poland
9.12 Russia
9.13 Spain
9.14 Sweden
9:15 a.m. Swiss
9.16 UK
9.17 Rest of Europe

ten Middle East and africa smart grid technology market
10.1 Presentation
10.2 Egypt
10.3 Israel
10.4 Qatar
10.5 Saudi Arabia
10.6 South Africa
10.7 United Arab Emirates
10.8 Rest of MEA

11 APAC Smart Grid Technology Market
11.1 Presentation
11.2 Australia
11.3 Bangladesh
11.4 China
11.5 India
11.6 Indonesia
11.7 Japan
11.8 Malaysia
11.9 Philippines
11.10 Singapore
11.11 South Korea
11.12 Sri Lanka
11.13 Thailand
11.14 Taiwan
11.15 Rest of Asia Pacific

12 Competitive landscape
12.1 Competitive Quadrant
12.2 Market Share Analysis
12.3 Strategic Initiatives
12.3.1M&A and investments
12.3.2 Partnerships and collaborations
12.3.3 Product Developments and Improvements

13 company profiles
13.1 ABB
13.2 Aclara Powerline Systems
13.3 C3 AI
13.4 Cisco Systems
13.5 Eatons
13.6 Enel X North America
13.7 Esyasoft Technologies
13.8 General Electrical
13.9 Globema
13.10 Grid4C
13.11 Honeywell
13.12IBM
13.13 Itron
13.14 Kamstrup
1:15 p.m. Landis+Gyr
13.16 International Open Systems
13.17 Oracle
13.18 S&C Electrical
13.19 Schneider Electric
13.20 Siemens
13.21 Tantalus Systems
13.22 Tech Mahindra
13.23 Trilliant Holdings
13.24 Wipro

14 Appendix

For more information about this report visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/r/o25nll

Media Contact:

Research and Markets
Laura Woodsenior
press@researchandmarkets.com

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SOURCE Research and Markets

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The Brussels Regional Parliament denounces the ban on Kosher Shechita by Jean-Claude Van Damme | The Jewish Press – JewishPress.com | David Israel | 20 Sivan 5782 – June 19, 2022 https://rglb.org/the-brussels-regional-parliament-denounces-the-ban-on-kosher-shechita-by-jean-claude-van-damme-the-jewish-press-jewishpress-com-david-israel-20-sivan-5782-june-19-2022/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 11:23:27 +0000 https://rglb.org/the-brussels-regional-parliament-denounces-the-ban-on-kosher-shechita-by-jean-claude-van-damme-the-jewish-press-jewishpress-com-david-israel-20-sivan-5782-june-19-2022/ Photo credit: Screenshot from Facebook Hollywood star Jean-Claude Van Damme in an appeal against kosher shechita in Belgium. The Brussels regional parliament voted on Friday against banning the slaughter of Jewish shechita and halal Muslims. The vote, 42 against 38, followed the recommendation of a parliamentary commission which, on June 9, rejected the ban proposed […]]]>

Photo credit: Screenshot from Facebook

Hollywood star Jean-Claude Van Damme in an appeal against kosher shechita in Belgium.

The Brussels regional parliament voted on Friday against banning the slaughter of Jewish shechita and halal Muslims. The vote, 42 against 38, followed the recommendation of a parliamentary commission which, on June 9, rejected the ban proposed by the Brussels Minister of Animal Welfare Bernard Clerfayt.

In 1970, after decades of conflict between French-speaking and Flemish Belgians, a new constitution transformed the country into a federal system, with a central parliament and three separate state parliaments: Flanders, Wallonia and Brussels. Regional and community parliaments and governments have jurisdiction over transport, public works, water policy, cultural issues, education, public health, environment, housing, zoning and economic policy and industrial. Legislative powers in Belgium are divided between the national, regional and community levels.

Early last week, Jean-Claude Van Damme, who has lent his fame and influence to the animal rights organization GAIA, announced that he was outraged by the result of the vote in the committee of the Brussels Parliament in favor the slaughter of unstunned animals. In a video broadcast by GAIA, the Hollywood star called on the Brussels parliament to approve a ban on the slaughter of Jews and Muslims on Friday and to “end the cruel suffering of animals”.

Kosher slaughter is illegal in Wallonia and Flanders, and local Jews and Muslims have to pay for imported meat. President of the European Convention of Rabbis, Pinchas Goldschmid, said in a statement: “We fully agree with the decision of the Parliament of Brussels, declaring that Shechita and Halal are legal. The bans on slaughter without stunning enacted in the Belgian regions of Flanders and Wallonia in 2020 banned Shechita and Halal, blatantly trampling on the religious freedoms of Jewish and Muslim communities, hundreds of thousands of Belgian citizens.

Rabbi Goldschmid suggested that “these unsolicited bans have a dark historical precedent; rather than ushering in a future of increased animal welfare, these alarming legislative bans are instead a harsh and destructive step backwards. The law should never be used as an unsolicited weapon against religious communities.

He applauded “the vote of the Brussels Regional Parliament on Friday, declaring that these religious methods of slaughter are not illegal, thus restoring these religious rights in the country. We pay tribute to Chief Rabbi Guigui and Rabbi Bruno Fiszon for their efforts.

GAIA has threatened a “state of emergency for thousands of animals”, and its president, Michel Vandenbosch, has said that scientific evidence of the suffering of unstunned animals, court rulings in Belgium and the EU, and the bans in Wallonia and Flanders provide a “fair balance between religious freedom and animal welfare interests”.

But of course that is not the case. An animal is considered “traif” if it has suffered an injury that would result in its death within a year, in which case it cannot be slaughtered kosher. The electric shock he receives would certainly kill him within a year, and so it doesn’t matter how sharp the knife of kosher slaughter is.

On Thursday, GAIA suggested that “Jean-Claude Van Damme might be able to push the Brussels parliament to take the most ethically sound, progressive and justified decision in the interests of the weaker and more vulnerable, animals”.

Mission failed.

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Belgian authorities accused of “systematically” refusing accommodation to asylum seekers https://rglb.org/belgian-authorities-accused-of-systematically-refusing-accommodation-to-asylum-seekers/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 12:25:52 +0000 https://rglb.org/belgian-authorities-accused-of-systematically-refusing-accommodation-to-asylum-seekers/ A Belgian court ruled this week that state authorities violated the right to reception of asylum seekers in a “deliberate, coordinated and persistent” manner. Human rights activists have long denounced the fact that many migrants and refugees in Belgium are left homeless because reception facilities are full. In Belgium, there has long been a dispute […]]]>

A Belgian court ruled this week that state authorities violated the right to reception of asylum seekers in a “deliberate, coordinated and persistent” manner. Human rights activists have long denounced the fact that many migrants and refugees in Belgium are left homeless because reception facilities are full.

In Belgium, there has long been a dispute over a policy for welcoming asylum seekers that has left some migrants and refugees temporarily homeless. In the capital of the country, Brussels in particular, foreigners who did not have access to reception structures have created camps in parks.

When deciding on access to reception centers, authorities reportedly prioritize asylum seekers deemed vulnerable and asylum seekers who have not applied for asylum in other countries. of the EU – which leaves, in particular, single men on the streets for days at a time. time.

Not enough space for all asylum seekers in reception centers

State authorities say they have been overwhelmed by the number of arrivals, leaving them with no choice but to put some people on the waiting list for accommodation due to the capacity of the facilities. [According to Belgian media reports, there are roughly 30,000 places at asylum seeker centers in the country.]

Refugee and migrant rights activists, however, accuse the authorities – in particular Migration Minister Sammy Mahdi – of fostering conditions in which migrants are left homeless. They believe that the rapid reception of Ukrainian refugees shows that reception capacities can be expanded quickly, if the authorities are willing to do so.

Court: “Deliberate practice of not granting reception”

This week, the Brussels Labor Court found that the Federal Agency for the Reception of Asylum Seekers (Fedasil) and the Secretary of State for Asylum and Migration Sammy Mahdi had deliberately and systematically failed to provide accommodation for asylum seekers, according to various Belgian media published on Tuesday. (June 14).

It appears that Fedasil has “a deliberate, coordinated and persistent practice [of] not granting the right to reception to asylum seekers who are clearly entitled to it,” the court wrote, according to a report by the newspaper. From Standard.

The practice of refusing accommodation “seems desirable, thoughtful and organized” by the Secretary of State for Asylum and Migration, Sammy Mahdi (CD&V), considered the court, according to From Standard.

Secretary of State for Asylum and Migration Policy Sammy Mahdi, in May 2021 | Photo credit: picture alliance/BELGA PHOTO/Eric Lalmand

The court’s decision was based on hundreds of previous court rulings this year, where asylum seekers had sued authorities for being denied accommodation.

Over 1,400 lawsuits have been filed against Fedasil for failing to grant asylum as required by EU law since the start of 2022; more than 1,000 such lawsuits have been successful — but the home policy has not changed significantly, according to reports from the news site The Brussels Times.

Prosecutors are said to have deliberated on whether the allegations against Fedasil and Mahdi warrant criminal charges.

No will or no way to create more reception capacity?

Migration Minister Mahdi, of the Christian Democratic and Flemish Party, rejected the court’s decision. Reacting to the court ruling, he tweeted: “Nonsense. When places are limited, choices have to be made. Every month, +1,000 asylum seekers in transit [arrive] in Belgium who already have a bed in another EU country. A waiting list [is] necessary.”

From Standard quoted the minister as saying there was “absolutely no intention to deliberately leave people on the streets, as the court seems to be insinuating”.

In a Twitter thread, Thomas Willekens of refugee rights organization Vluchtelingenwerk Vlaanderen criticized Mahdi’s statement, saying his statements were a “distortion of reality”. He tweeted that people who have applied for asylum in other EU countries “also have a right of reception in Belgium, separate from the previous application in another country”.

He also argued that a drastic increase in reception capacities in Belgium in 2015 – after the arrival of a large number of Syrian refugees – and the creation of more than 10,000 reception places for Ukrainian refugees showed that capacities could be increased”, provided [there is the] political will.”

Long wait for many asylum seekers

Asylum seekers in Belgium often face long waiting times for their cases to be heard and authorities have a large backlog of unprocessed claims, leading to even longer waiting times. According to a report by From Standard citing state officials. The newspaper reported that more than 20,000 people were awaiting a response on their asylum applications by the end of May.

Last year, migrants staged a hunger strike in Brussels, calling on the authorities to grant them residence permits |  Photo: Dursun Aydemir/AA/picture-alliance
Last year, migrants staged a hunger strike in Brussels, calling on the authorities to grant them residence permits | Photo: Dursun Aydemir/AA/picture-alliance

Belgium’s asylum policy made headlines around the world last year, as a hunger strike by foreigners in Brussels seeking a legal residence permit spanned month.

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Inclusion Models – Architecture https://rglb.org/inclusion-models-architecture/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 05:24:10 +0000 https://rglb.org/inclusion-models-architecture/ Freed from exaggerated dreams of a healing environment, architectures of care can repair the old logic of separation of mentally and physically handicapped people, which often resulted in segregation. The reintegration of the disabled person into society is part of the challenge of inclusion. Aligning spatial parameters and housing patterns with their special and changing […]]]>

Freed from exaggerated dreams of a healing environment, architectures of care can repair the old logic of separation of mentally and physically handicapped people, which often resulted in segregation. The reintegration of the disabled person into society is part of the challenge of inclusion. Aligning spatial parameters and housing patterns with their special and changing needs is another, as is the reverse: asking how architecture can help citizens take on ordinary caregiving tasks for their disabled neighbours. The experimental architecture of Monnikenheide, a residential care complex for people with disabilities in Zoersel, Belgium, has approached inclusion as a dynamic design challenge since its inception in 1972.

The history of Monnikenheide begins with its founders, Wivina and Paul Demeester. As a member of the Flemish Christian Democratic Party, Wivina Demeester was State Secretary in several federal and regional governments from 1985 to 1999, during which time she held positions in the fields of health, social assistance and public administration. She was also a decisive figure in the landscape of architecture in Flanders, playing a fundamental role in the development of both the position of architect of the Flemish government and of the Flemish Institute of Architecture. His interests in politics, healthcare and architecture culminated in finding a suitable living solution for the couple’s son, Steven, who has Down syndrome.

In the 1970s, people with disabilities still often lived either in or on the fringes of psychiatric institutions. According to Wivina Demeester, they reached a breaking point when looking for accommodation for their son, especially during a visit to the famous Stropstraat in Ghent, the main campus of the Brothers of Charity, which provides services care for all kinds of patients. , mentally ill and disabled. After the visit, the Demeesters began their effort to provide alternative housing that radically includes people with disabilities in society and recognizes their specific territorial needs and desires. In Monnikenheide, the traditional logic of asylums with large “bedhouses” has been replaced by an open framework of small-scale facilities that function as surrogate families.

Monnikenheide is made up of a series of residential facilities built as part of a suburban housing estate, a typical settlement pattern, in the Kempen region. Its facilities are spread over a wooded lot at the back of the Demeester family villa, located on the edge of a nature reserve. The projects built differ from each other, but what is more important than their aesthetic differences is the design intelligence that has been achieved by experimenting with architectural typologies and spatial parameters. A walk through Monnikenheide today presents an evolution of care, following a progressive insight into how architecture can support the inclusion of people with disabilities.

Family Replacement Units

Monnikenheide’s architecture is defined by an evolving typology of the surrogate family unit, which allows small groups of residents to function almost independently. The first lodging house, designed by Bruno Boulanger in 1970 and which today serves as a central service building, originally consisted of three identical pavilions. Constructed using the Danilith pre-engineered system, a single hallway connected the common services pavilion in the middle to the boys’ and girls’ pavilions on both sides. With a large capacity in its collective bedrooms, the repetition of the pavilions contrasts sharply with the classic typology of dormitories used in hospitals. This emphasis on small units is recognizable in all the other buildings on the site.

When renovated in 2003 by Jo Peeters, the building’s capacity was reduced to one group of residents per pavilion, with living rooms placed on one side of the hallway and individual bedrooms on the other. The central corridor has also been extended, and a fourth pavilion has been added in the enfilade. The spine that connects all the pavilions together has been transformed with huge glass windows to ensure it doesn’t look like a hospital hallway. A launderette and a therapy pool have been constructed facing the new entrance to the building, which, as separate facilities, are intended to stimulate the use of the outdoors and improve the dynamics of entry and exit. The recent building of From Eiken (2017), designed by UR architects, added an additional fifth pavilion to the spine, with a facade that suggests it’s the end of the line.

The next building in Monnikenheide, the Monnikenbos (1980), was designed as group housing for permanent residence by Luc Van den Broeck. Like a scout bivouac, the complex brings together in a common entrance hall three houses of eight people each in a slightly anthroposophical style of bricks and sloping roofs. In 2020, the Monnikenbos complex was dismantled and used as the base for a new, expanded residential facility by UR architects. The renovation removed the central entrance pavilion which served as access to the three pavilions, thus upsetting the logic of circulation. Today, the three pavilions are even more linked to each other; since the space between them is no longer hidden behind doors, it functions as a shared open courtyard for the different groups of residents.

Spaces of inclusion

The architecture of Monnikenheide also uses its spatial environment for the inclusion of people with mental and physical disabilities. The idea was to free people with disabilities from the logic of asylums by situating them in the normal urban and social fabric, more precisely the typical Flemish suburbs. The center is built as an open estate in the woods. Lodges are scattered around the Demeester estate, and residents are encouraged not only to use the smaller units tailored to their specific care needs, but also to wander through the woods, the neighborhood and even the center of the village, all without, if possible, being accompanied by staff.

In its attempt to meet the specific care needs of its residents, Monnikenheide has pioneered the architectural typology of sheltered housing, which offers people with disabilities the opportunity to live independently. Although the Monnikenheide location is considered inclusive, the setting ultimately limits the possibilities for some guests, especially in terms of self-sufficiency. The House at the Voorne (2002), designed by Dirk Somers (then part of Huiswerk, now Bovenbouw) was therefore not located on the Monnikenheide campus, but along the main street just outside the village center of Zoersel. The house has capacity for eight residents, who are expected to organize their work and live independently. Nursing staff are only available to help with breakfast and evenings.

The location of the reception center offers residents direct proximity to social services (bakeries, grocery stores, bus stops, etc.) and thus promotes their participation in the village community. Society can act as a support network for people with disabilities. Not only its facilities, however, but also its people. For this reason, the house at church (2005), designed by Johan De Coster (then part of RAUM, now VDC architects) is located in the heart of the village, just opposite the main church. The central location allows residents to establish a relational network and, in turn, allows villagers to unwittingly care for people with disabilities, for example by helping them cross the street, giving them change at the checkout at the grocery store, etc.

Interlaced lines of operation

Sheltered housing is not just about its spatial setting; it also shows variations in the typology of a retirement home, and more particularly in the arrangement of studio-type rooms compared to common rooms. In the Maison à la Voorne, the common space remains quite limited and uncluttered, the living room being at the same time dining room, kitchen and atrium, the individual rooms being designed as studios equipped with a kitchenette. The internal logic of the house in the church, however, is designed more similarly to a classic house by emphasizing the living room and the kitchen, which function as comfortable and familiar common areas, and an open staircase which leads to single bedrooms upstairs.

The typological innovations of the sheltered housing projects were reflected in the new buildings of the main campus in Monnikenheide. Huis aan ‘t Laar (2012), designed by Peter Swinnen (then part of 51N4E, now CRIT. architects), transposes the typology of the sheltered house into a free-standing house in the woods. Huis aan ‘t Laar is used for people with greater care needs but who are still able to live independently. The house brings together two groups of eight people around a spiral staircase around which the groups are constantly in contact but never touch. The rooms are conceptualized as small L-shaped studios with two windows, so each room has corners with different perspectives.

The same logic appears in the construction of Villa Kameleon (2021), designed by FELT, a sheltered house located a stone’s throw from the Demeester estate. The house presents itself as a free-standing villa, blending into the suburban plan, but brings together eight L-shaped rooms in a hexagon-shaped floor plan. The central hall is a rather uncluttered circulation space that allows residents to access their private rooms without having to go through the common lounges or dining rooms, thus enjoying privacy and independence in their daily comings and goings.

Coda

The short history of architectural production in Monnikenheide testifies to the dynamic logic of inclusion of people with mental and physical disabilities. While the Monnikenheide settlement negated the old logic of separation underlying the asylum and its stigmatizing habitat patterns by offering residents the right to a territory of their own, its subsequent developments opened a negation permanent negation that stretches and rethinks the territorial scope of the inhabitants. Beyond good and bad, it diversifies options for adapting to changing needs, not only between different people, but also across a lifetime.

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Ireland v Ukraine is much more important than football https://rglb.org/ireland-v-ukraine-is-much-more-important-than-football/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 05:54:06 +0000 https://rglb.org/ireland-v-ukraine-is-much-more-important-than-football/ Bill Shankly’s oft-quoted quote claimed football was ‘much more important’ than a matter of life and death, and while Ukraine proves that to be nonsense, it can still lift the spirits of a nation, even in the darkest times. Ireland welcome Ukraine to the Aviva Stadium in a game far more important than wins, draws, […]]]>

Bill Shankly’s oft-quoted quote claimed football was ‘much more important’ than a matter of life and death, and while Ukraine proves that to be nonsense, it can still lift the spirits of a nation, even in the darkest times.

Ireland welcome Ukraine to the Aviva Stadium in a game far more important than wins, draws, losses or football itself, with the war-torn country receiving the warmest of welcomes as fans return for watch Boys in Green for the first time from home since March.

Stephen Kenny’s side will be ready to bounce back from the disappointing defeat in Armenia in their second Nations League game against a Ukrainian side who missed out on a World Cup spot but won the admiration of millions around the world because of how they’ve fared over the past week.

Fans draped in Ukrainian national flags hold a ‘Stop the War’ banner during the FIFA World Cup 2022 Semi-Final Qualifying football match between Scotland and Ukraine at Hampden Park in Glasgow, in Scotland, June 1, 2022. Photo: Andy Buchanan / AFP via Getty Images

Manchester City star Oleksandr Zinchenko broke down in tears during a press conference ahead of his country’s World Cup semi-final tie against Scotland.

Asked by the media present what this match meant to him, an emotional Zinchenko said: “We want to give incredible emotions to the Ukrainian people because the Ukrainians deserve it so much right now.”

Ahead of the draw at Hampden Park, the full-back also expressed his appreciation to Steve Clarke’s Scotland side for their ‘incredible help’ after they agreed to postpone the original game in March following the eruption of violence in Ukraine weeks earlier, setting the standard for other nations.

Ukraine midfielder Oleksandr Zinchenko reacts during a news conference at Hampden Park, Glasgow on May 31, 2022 on the eve of their 2022 World Cup qualifier soccer match between Scotland and Ukraine. Photo: Andy Buchanan/AFP via Getty Images

Stephen Kenny spoke eloquently about the plight of the Ukrainian people – many of whom saw their national team narrowly fail to seal a place in Qatar in bomb shelters with a narrow loss to Wales on Sunday – and now it is around Ireland.

Ukraine will not take part in the 2022 World Cup, so it falls to its allies – less constrained by political tensions on the ground – to show their support and raise awareness, starting here: if Ireland are really the best supporter in the world, it’s time to show everyone how it’s done.

Every photograph, banner, article and viral video of fans and players on Loud Lansdowne Road; everyone has a role to play and everyone must make sure their part counts.

A young Ukrainian supporter raises a Ukrainian flag reading + ‘STOP WAR’ during the FIFA World Cup Qualifiers match between Wales and Ukraine at Cardiff City Stadium on June 05, 2022 in Cardiff, Netherlands Wales. Photo: James Gill – Danehouse/Getty Images

Ties between the countries have grown stronger in recent months, with Ireland sending large amounts of non-military aid to help the sprawling refugee crisis developing on Ukraine’s western border. Addressing the Oireachtas in April, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky thanked Ireland for “the humanitarian and financial support given to Ukraine”.

The general public has also played its part in helping to welcome the arrival of more than 30,000 Ukrainian refugees since the start of the conflict, helping them integrate into society and providing them with accommodation where possible.

The FAI has offered 2,000 tickets to a selection of these Ukrainian refugees and support for Oleksandr Petrakov’s team is expected to be strong in Dublin. The lack of atmosphere that usually surrounds the visiting teams’ anthems should surely be corrected by this strong Ukrainian contingent, who will make their presence felt to help their team provide momentary relief to those who have stayed at home.

A supporter waves a Ukrainian flag during the friendly match between the Republic of Ireland and Belgium at the Aviva Stadium in Dublin. Photo: Michael P Ryan/Sportsfile

In turn, Ireland must give their best against a Ukrainian side who have asked for no handouts, but rather to be judged on sporting merit – despite more than half of their squad being without competitive football until to this international window.

Tonight’s result will pale into insignificance, but the respect and integrity shown to Ukraine on and off the pitch is what will be remembered.

Ireland is a proud nation, whose citizens are more than happy to receive praise for their friendliness, hospitality and ‘craic’ – how much our many expats yearn for these seemingly universal traits after moving to Ireland. foreign. The Irish are also synonymous with resilience, which the Ukrainian people have shown in abundance in the face of the greatest adversity in the battle for their homeland.

Ukraine national football team poses for a photo during the FIFA World Cup Qualifiers match between Wales and Ukraine at Cardiff City Stadium on June 05, 2022 in Cardiff, Wales. Photo: James Gill – Danehouse/Getty Images

Football is an integral part of Irish society, with the unforgettable reign of Jack Charlton capturing the hearts of the nation and ushering in the Celtic Tiger.

Tonight is an opportunity to keep Ukraine in the spotlight as the minutes devoted to international coverage of the war dwindle, an opportunity to bring joy to a people who have endured so much these four months — to help him keep sight, no matter how difficult, that the world is behind them and that their own new era is coming.

Sport serves as a tool of hope to give a glimpse of brighter days ahead for the people of Ukraine – we must play our part, just like Scotland and Wales have done, like everyone else must too.

Welcoming them to Dublin represents an opportunity for Ireland, it is up to us to seize it by giving back as much as possible. There are no limits, that’s the least Ukraine deserves.

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Real estate transfers | Mount Airy News https://rglb.org/real-estate-transfers-mount-airy-news/ Sun, 05 Jun 2022 16:45:00 +0000 https://rglb.org/real-estate-transfers-mount-airy-news/ June 01, 2022 Although Livia Livengood is a career educator who can speak four languages, her multi-talented background established over the years did not include being an expert baker. However, that has changed in recent months with the Russian invasion of Ukraine, which has been accompanied by the local resident spending a lot of time […]]]>

Although Livia Livengood is a career educator who can speak four languages, her multi-talented background established over the years did not include being an expert baker.

However, that has changed in recent months with the Russian invasion of Ukraine, which has been accompanied by the local resident spending a lot of time around the oven in addition to her teaching job at Mount Airy Secondary School.

Livenwood, originally from Romania, was so touched by the plight of Ukrainian refugees that she started baking and selling bread from her home’s kitchen to help them financially. And at last report, that effort had generated more than $12,000 — including 142 loaves as of Monday afternoon.

“I just wanted to do something to help out,” said Livengood, who worked in high school for 16 years, currently teaching Spanish.

Although her bread-making charity project coincided with the Russian attack on Ukraine, she wasn’t exactly a newbie in the baking department, though it was a relatively recently acquired skill.

“I’m not (a baker by tradition),” Livengood said without hesitation, explaining that adopting the role stemmed from her own family’s needs in the wake of the pandemic.

“You didn’t know if you were going to find bread in the store,” she explained.

So, after the Ukrainian invasion, Livengood naturally turned to her new cooking abilities to help refugees, initially generating a net sum in a week via this method for a UNICEF program. “I was surprised to raise $400.”

Earlier, she and her 16-year-old daughter Laura baked bread together to provide agility items to a local dog park run by Rotary Club members.

Livengood’s Ukrainian attendance grew a bit after seeing refugees up close and personal rather than such random individuals on TV.

This happened because some fled to her native country, Romania, located in the same part of the world as Ukraine, who struck a chord with the local woman upon seeing them.

A German pastor from a church in Romania who was caring for 17 refugees, including a number of children, posted a photo of the group. “He puts them in the German parish church,” Livengood said.

“I saw the children and I thought, ‘I have to do more for the children,'” she added of expanding her Ukrainian aid efforts, noting that many worthy organizations provide assistance.

“This pastor is the brother of one of my best friends from high school,” Livengood explained. “He didn’t even ask for help, he just posted the photo, and I was saddened by it – I just wanted to do something to help.”

Consumer prices are much higher in Romania than here, according to the Mount Airy High teacher.

“Everything is double there,” Livengood said, including a $2,000-a-month electricity bill where the refugees were housed. “I don’t know how people survive and get by, it’s so expensive to live.”

Thousands of dollars have been spent just to bring in refugees from Ukraine.

Four loaves a day

Livia Livengood suddenly found herself juggling the job of teaching at Mount Airy High School with a growing side business of baking bread, which certainly implied a marketable product, given her previous success in baking. fundraiser for UNICEF and the dog park. “Everybody loves bread.”

This would eventually include baking four to six loaves a day in her kitchen at home. “It’s yeast bread,” she said of the product at issue. “It looks and tastes like sourdough.”

The process isn’t as easy as it sounds, with the bread dough having to be put together at the end of each day, Livengood advised. “And he gets up during the night.” The dough should also be kneaded, baking being done in the morning before the teacher comes to school.

There was one occasion when Livengood overloaded his oven and nearly set the house on fire. “It was a bad idea,” she admits, which also involved burning the four loaves that were baking at the time.

Her family have been very understanding about the business, she said, which in addition to her daughter includes husband Rob and son Luca, 14.

Livia and Rob met in 2001 while serving overseas with the Peace Corps. She came to Mount Airy in 2004.

“I’ve been teaching high school for 16 years,” said Livengood, who in addition to teaching Spanish now, also taught German for a few years. On the whole, she speaks these two languages, plus English and Romanian.

After operating at peak production, the baking operation has gradually scaled down from four to two loaves a day and now around two every other day.

“Right now it’s very manageable,” Livengood said.

Audience willing to help

“The response has been very overwhelming — in a very positive way,” Livengood said of the bread-making campaign. The process of ordering/selling breads was done through a Facebook page she maintains to help Ukrainians.

This has been bolstered by the many followers she has accumulated over the years, including former students and others. “I have quite a few followers, which helps.”

A suggested charge, or donation, for each loaf is $20, with the option to pay more – due to the added motivation of helping oppressed people rather than just getting your money’s worth.

“Some give $20 and some give $100 – it’s up to people what they want to give,” Livengood said. “A lot of people just wanted the bread.”

Besides its sales, contributions to help Ukrainians have taken other forms.

Livengood mentioned attending a charity event to promote her cause earlier this year at Miss Angel’s Farm. “A complete stranger gave me $500.”

The Central Methodist Church also donated $1,000.

Meanwhile, Donna Bailey baked cinnamon rolls to support the fundraiser, and Harlan Stone baked a few loaves of bread for the effort.

Some people donated flour, including Chris Wishart, the chef of Old North State Winery, who donated a 60-pound bag. Mount Airy Beta Sigma Phi Xi Alpha Pi Chapter donated $500, with group members donating more individually.

Among other helpers, Pamela Hicks raised $1,000 by donating two of her paintings to Ukrainian fundraising, including hosting an online silent auction that saved Livengood time. She also thanked Mark Walker and Stanton Denman for obtaining the paintings, as well as an anonymous donor who contributed $400.

“People have given so much,” observed the teacher/baker. “The generosity of people has been incredible.”

All the money goes to the church in Romania.

Livengood stressed that refugees will continue to need rent and other support as they settle into new homes and she plans to maintain her bread-making business indefinitely.

“As long as it helps. »

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Cosmin Costinaş, Inti Guerrero will be the curator of the 24th Biennale of Sydney https://rglb.org/cosmin-costinas-inti-guerrero-will-be-the-curator-of-the-24th-biennale-of-sydney/ Tue, 31 May 2022 19:02:06 +0000 https://rglb.org/cosmin-costinas-inti-guerrero-will-be-the-curator-of-the-24th-biennale-of-sydney/ Berlin curators Cosmin Costinaș and Inti Guerrero have been named Artistic Directors of the 2024 Biennale of Sydney. Their appointment marks only the second time in the Biennale’s forty-nine-year history that the event has been co-directed. The twenty-fourth edition of the Biennale, Australia’s largest contemporary art event, will take place from March 9 to June […]]]>

Berlin curators Cosmin Costinaș and Inti Guerrero have been named Artistic Directors of the 2024 Biennale of Sydney. Their appointment marks only the second time in the Biennale’s forty-nine-year history that the event has been co-directed. The twenty-fourth edition of the Biennale, Australia’s largest contemporary art event, will take place from March 9 to June 24 in the port capital of the Australian territory of New South Wales: no location or theme has yet been announced.

Costinaș and Guerrero are longtime friends who have worked on several projects together while maintaining individual curatorial practices. The duo jointly organized the 2018 Dakar Biennale in Senegal; the 2016-17 traveling exhibition “Soil and Stones, Souls and Songs”, which appeared in Manila, Hong Kong and Bangkok; and the widely acclaimed 2013 show “A Diary of the Year of the Plague,” at Para Site and Sheung Wan Civic Center Exhibition Hall in Hong Kong. Furthermore, Costinaș organized the Romanian pavilion at this year’s Venice Biennale, which opened on April 23; he was artistic director of the Kathmandu Triennale 2022 and curatorial advisor of the Aichi Triennale 2022. From 2011 to 2022, he was director of Para Site. Guerrero, who curated the biennial international exhibition EVA 2018 in Ireland, is an instructor in the curatorial studies program at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts-KASK in Ghent, Belgium; he was previously, from 2016 to 2020, the assistant curator of Estrellita B. Brodsky at the Tate, London.

“I am delighted to work with Cosmin Costinaș and Inti Guerrero, highly respected curators both together and independently with a deep understanding of the international and Australian creative landscapes,” said Barbara Moore, CEO of the Biennale. “The Biennale of Sydney is a participatory platform designed to showcase the best of contemporary art from around the world, inviting discussion and shared learning about the joys and challenges of our times.

Costinaș and Guerrero noted that although their plans for the exhibition remained nebulous at this early stage, they hoped to bring into play the “multiplicity of visual regimes that form the lived experience of most people around the world”. The duality of their respective worldviews will likely also come into play, though discord between the two friends seems unlikely. Still, a lively thrill can infuse conservation procedures. “If you don’t argue with someone, that means you don’t respect that person,” Guerrero told the Sydney Morning Herald. “You should get involved emotionally and intellectually.”

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2022/23 UEFA Nations League A predictions: England will win https://rglb.org/2022-23-uefa-nations-league-a-predictions-england-will-win/ Sat, 28 May 2022 07:22:55 +0000 https://rglb.org/2022-23-uefa-nations-league-a-predictions-england-will-win/ The 2022/23 UEFA Nations League season kicks off in a matter of days, making it the perfect time to predict how the tournament will unfold. This is the fourth and final article in a series that will predict each group. It’s finally time to predict Nations League A. Specifically, the teams that will qualify for […]]]>

The 2022/23 UEFA Nations League season kicks off in a matter of days, making it the perfect time to predict how the tournament will unfold. This is the fourth and final article in a series that will predict each group. It’s finally time to predict Nations League A. Specifically, the teams that will qualify for the Nations League final and be relegated.

UEFA Nations League A predictions 2022/23

France favorites face stiff competition from Denmark

Group A1 includes reigning world champions France alongside their 2018 World Cup final opponents Croatia. Denmark were on the threshold of a European final last summer and will be eager to continue their successful hunt this Nations League season. An inconsistent Austria completes the group.

As reigning world champions and the team with the strongest squad in the group, one might be tempted to instantly declare France the winner of the group. It’s not that simple, however. Not only because of France poor Euro 2020 display, but also due to their tendency to drop points against weaker teams in World Cup qualifying. Denmark actually outclassed France in both competitions. Blues‘harder opposition only partly justifies this, but not entirely.

One possible explanation for France’s occasional disappointing scores is that they are a team that tends to do just enough to win, but nothing more. Like in the 2018 World Cup, where they won everything despite their mediocrity in the group stage. No team came close to claiming direct qualification ahead of France, meaning a draw was often enough for them. Moreover, they proved to be strong in the Nations League last season winning a very competitive group.

Denmark are also a good team. Looking at the clubs represented by a Denmark national team starting line-up, one could be forgiven for thinking it belongs to teams like the Netherlands or Germany. A sentiment still reflected in the Elo ratings. Denmark reaching the semi-finals of Euro 2020 was a legitimately strong team that lived up to expectations, not some sensational underdog story. Anyway, France are just a stronger team and should therefore be favored. The depth of their team is incredible. However, Denmark have a chance of reaching the final before France.

Solid Croatia set to avoid relegation from Nations League A

Croatia, while still strong, have declined too much since their peak in 2018 to be considered a top contender. Their performance in the World Cup qualifiers is comparable to what France and Denmark have achieved. Croatia’s performance at the Euros was similar to that of France, both relegated to the round of 16 magic monday, but Blues‘ group was more difficult.

Croatia’s performance in the previous Nations League season is concerning. To get just three points in a group that, in all honesty, was very difficult. Nevertheless, France and Denmark’s point tallies were too high for Croatia to be excused by the difficulty of their group, especially France, with whom they shared groups. Croatia’s Elo rating works as another tiebreaker.

However, the Croatians are likely to be favored over Austria, who have been poor in World Cup qualifying despite having a strong Euro campaign. Austria’s inconsistency, combined with their side being the weakest in the group, makes relegation likely unless new Ralf Rangnick can bring the Wunderteam 1930s, or at least the form they showed at the Euro.

Spain at the forefront of highly competitive groups

Group A2 is interesting with Spain and Portugal which will compose a highly anticipated Iberian derby. It has the potential to be very exciting. Likewise, Switzerland have had some exciting matches in recent years and also call this group their home. The Czech Republic completes the group.

The Czech Republic are solid, but this group is too competitive for them not to finish fourth. Their team and performance in World Cup qualifying is worse than any other team in this group. It should be noted that the Czechs went further than Portugal at the Euro. However, it’s too anecdotal to save the Czech Republic from relegation in these predictions.

Switzerland cannot be underestimated. They slightly outclassed Portugal in World Cup and Euro qualifiers. Meanwhile, Portugal enjoys a slightly higher Elo rating and a stronger squad. In other words, Portugal and Switzerland are indistinguishable. Spain narrowly eclipsed them at the Euros and World Cup qualifiers, making them the narrowest of favourites. Plus, their Elo rating is microscopically superior.

But make no mistake: the battle for first place is a three-horse race. One that will probably be extraordinarily close. Spain, Portugal and even Switzerland can win it.

England win group of death

Group A3 is terrifying. It contains the teams that made up the Euro final last year, Italy and England. Alongside those two are a German side in search of redemption with a successful and relatively newly appointed manager, Hansi Flick, who recently guided Bayern Munich to a UEFA Champions League title. Even the group’s presumptive ‘whipping boys’, Hungary, have produced impressive results over the past two years. Either way, there’s no denying that they’ll almost certainly be relegated. All the other teams in this staggering group are simply better.

Had Italy maintained the form they showed at the Euros, they might have been the marginal favorite to finish top, but things have changed since then. After dropping points against Bulgaria, Switzerland and Northern Ireland in the World Cup qualifiers, the Azzuri lost terribly at home to North Macedonia and missed back-to-back World Cups for the first time in their history. At this point, Italy are a bit behind England and Germany until proven otherwise.

Germany also recently suffered a devastating loss to North Macedonia in the European Qualifiers, but Die Mannschaft recovered well by winning the remaining matches. Germany’s big comeback from their disastrous defeat meant their World Cup qualifying performance was on par with that of England, who dropped points against Poland and Hungary. However, England eclipsed Germany in the previous Nations League season and at Euro 2020. In fact, The Three Lions even defeated Die Mannschaft to the euro. Hansi Flick can very well get Germany back on their feet and top of the group, but England are still the favorites heading into the competition.

The Belgian “Golden Generation” has more to give

Group A4 offers a potentially exhilarating Benelux derby between Belgium and the Netherlands. A Poland inspired by Robert Lewandowski can also be found here. They’re not a one-man team, though. Finally, the group contains a Welsh team led by Gareth Bale.

Belgium should be seen as the favorites to advance to the final, although they will face fierce competition from their northern neighbours, the Netherlands. Either way, the Belgians got more points per game in World Cup qualifiers and the previous Nations League season than any other team in the group. If that wasn’t enough, they also outplayed all their upcoming Group A4 opponents at Euro 2020. The Red Devils are always the first in this group.

By the same logic, it can be assumed that the Netherlands will not have to participate in the relegation battle. That clash will likely be fought by Poland and Wales, who kick off this Nations League season on June 1. The match will probably be tight. Wales edged past Poland at the Euros and Poland slightly eclipsed Wales in World Cup qualifying. Likewise, their Elo ratings are too even to draw conclusions. With unscientific ‘gut feeling’ as the tiebreaker, the verdict of this article is that Wales will be relegated by a tiny margin.

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Embed from Getty Images

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Luxembourg City: a European capital in more ways than one https://rglb.org/luxembourg-city-a-european-capital-in-more-ways-than-one/ Thu, 26 May 2022 19:19:20 +0000 https://rglb.org/luxembourg-city-a-european-capital-in-more-ways-than-one/ 📷 Raphael Koerich Luxembourg may be the second smallest member state of the current European Union, but it plays a fairly large and active role in day-to-day affairs and decision-making at the EU level. Along with Brussels and Strasbourg, the city of Luxembourg is one of the three official European capitals. The capital’s close connection […]]]>

📷 Raphael Koerich

Luxembourg may be the second smallest member state of the current European Union, but it plays a fairly large and active role in day-to-day affairs and decision-making at the EU level. Along with Brussels and Strasbourg, the city of Luxembourg is one of the three official European capitals.

The capital’s close connection to the EU is not accidental, however. None other than Robert Schuman, often described as the pioneer of a united Europe, was born in Luxembourg in 1886. On 9 May 1950, Schuman proposed the creation of the European Coal and Steel Community (ECSC), which would become then the predecessor of all subsequent Community institutions. Along with France, Germany, Belgium, Italy and the Netherlands, Luxembourg is one of the six founding countries of the European Union. Thus, “Europeanness” has been at the very heart of Luxembourg’s identity for many decades.

📷 Raphael Koerich

The Kirchberg plateau, a modern and booming district in the northeast of the city of Luxembourg, has been home to major European institutions since the 1960s. Today, it houses the General Secretariat of the European Parliament, the European Investment Bank, the European Court of Auditors as well as various services of the European Commission, to name but a few.

But the City of Luxembourg is not only a European capital in political and economic terms. With more than 167 different nationalities living in the city, the capital could not be more multicultural and diverse. Indeed, of its 120,000 inhabitants, a staggering 70% are not Luxembourgers. With foreigners making up the majority of its population, the city is a veritable linguistic melting pot. Not only Luxembourgish, French and German are the official languages, but other languages ​​such as English and Portuguese are also widely spoken in the capital.

Come visit Luxembourg City for a truly European experience!

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