Belgium community – RGLB http://rglb.org/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 02:40:43 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://rglb.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T174556.459-150x150.png Belgium community – RGLB http://rglb.org/ 32 32 Ontario Catholic schools excited to see alumni at World Cup https://rglb.org/ontario-catholic-schools-excited-to-see-alumni-at-world-cup/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 23:00:02 +0000 https://rglb.org/ontario-catholic-schools-excited-to-see-alumni-at-world-cup/ Canada’s national soccer team midfielder Jonathan Osorio is seen in this undated photo. He went to school at St. Edmund Campion High School in Brampton, Ontario. (CNS Photo/courtesy Greg Spagnoli) by Quinton Amundson TORONTO (CNS) — Watching Canada take on the biggest soccer stars from around the world at the FIFA World Cup will be […]]]>
Canada’s national soccer team midfielder Jonathan Osorio is seen in this undated photo. He went to school at St. Edmund Campion High School in Brampton, Ontario. (CNS Photo/courtesy Greg Spagnoli)

by Quinton Amundson

TORONTO (CNS) — Watching Canada take on the biggest soccer stars from around the world at the FIFA World Cup will be especially exciting for students and staff at St. Edmund Campion High School in Brampton, Ont. .

The city is home to many members of the 26-man national football team, and three of those players – winger Tajon Buchanan, striker Cyle Larin and midfielder Jonathan Osorio – have all previously played for the team St. Edmund Campion Bears senior football club under head coach Greg Spagnoli.

“It’s great for the school community,” said Spagnoli, head of Campion’s physical education and health department. “These gentlemen have worked very hard to achieve these goals since they were in high school. We are very proud and delighted to say that they have come to our school and represented our Catholic school community in this capacity, and we all look forward to seeing them excel on the world stage.

Alphonso Davies celebrates a goal in Munich, Germany, September 30, 2022. Davies, who plays for Bayern Munich, is a member of Canada’s national team for the 2022 FIFA World Cup in Qatar. (CNS photo/Andreas Gebert, Reuters)

The three were named to Canada’s final roster on November 13, after helping Canada through tough World Cup qualification for only the second time in its history. The tournament begins in Qatar on November 20 and ends on December 18, when the world champion will be crowned. Canada’s preliminary round matches will see the team face Belgium on November 23, Croatia on November 27 and Morocco on December 1.

Osorio, Larin and Buchanan all tasted glory at the Ontario Federation of School Athletic Associations AAA Men’s Soccer Championship in different years. Osorio led the Bears to the title in 2009 as an 11th grader, Larin won three straight provincial crowns from 2011-2013, and 10th grader Buchanan won gold in 2015 before moving to Broomfield, Colorado to attend Legacy High School for his junior and senior year.

Spagnoli said his former players “all behave very differently, and how they are and how they behave.”

“John Osorio [was] very vocal and very instrumental in taking on this leadership role as he played for me at school. He was the guy who was involved and really trying to motivate his teammates during the game. He thrived carrying the team in that capacity,” Spagnoli said. “Cyle was a gentle giant. More reserved, a little calmer, he kind of stuck to his business and behaved by showing what he could do on the pitch. Tajon was a lot like Cyle, a quiet leader who did what he had to.

Cyle Larin, a striker for Canada’s national soccer team, is seen in this undated photo. He went to school at St. Edmund Campion High School in Brampton, Ontario. (CNS Photo/courtesy Greg Spagnoli)

Plans are underway for Edmund Campion’s classes to watch at least parts of the Team Canada matchups scheduled for the school day.

Spagnoli is looking forward to the opening kick-off and seeing his players on the brightest stage in the world. He has stayed in touch with his former players over the years. He traveled to the United States to see Larin play for the University of Connecticut. He periodically sends messages to Buchanan and Larin; both play for Club Brugge in Belgium. And Spagnoli regularly sees Osorio compete for Toronto FC.

FIFA World Cup fever also looks set to spread at Catholic high school Dante Alighieri Academy in Toronto as students and staff support defender Richie Laryea, who graduated in 2013.

“You feel excited as if you were a child,” said Mauro Ongaro, physical education teacher at Dante Alighieri. “There is a sense of pride because you were part of his life when he was in high school. All of us who taught him, coached him, are very proud of him and what he’s accomplished and everything he’s been through to get to this point of being a player. our national football team competing at the World Cup.

Tajon Buchanan, left, a winger for Canada’s national soccer team, is seen with his high school coach, Greg Spagnoli, in this undated photo. Buchanan went to school at St. Edmund Campion High School in Brampton, Ontario. (CNS Photo/courtesy Greg Spagnoli)

Ongaro said Laryea’s elite talent was immediately clear during his formative years, but what also stood out was his “perseverance and work ethic”. The teacher said it was clear the youngster “had the will to become a professional football player”.

Laryea’s personality, Ongaro said, made him an endearing figure in the academy.

“He was always very kind to teachers and other students. He has always been very popular with everyone. That’s what stands out,” Ongaro said. “He was always very inclusive with everyone too. He’s always been one of the guys. He never thought of himself as someone bigger. He was very humble.”

The school plans to gather as a full community in the auditorium to watch at least some of Laryea’s matches on the big screen.

A total of eight of the national team players have attended a Catholic primary, secondary or post-secondary institution throughout their journey to the world soccer scene.

Bayern Munich star Alphonso Davies, widely regarded as the Canadian team’s best player, is one of the eight. The 22-year-old fullback attended St. Teresa of Calcutta Elementary School in Edmonton, Alberta.

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World Cup 2018: First final for Croatia, second title for France | World Cup News https://rglb.org/world-cup-2018-first-final-for-croatia-second-title-for-france-world-cup-news/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 05:03:45 +0000 https://rglb.org/world-cup-2018-first-final-for-croatia-second-title-for-france-world-cup-news/ As was the case in the last World Cup, the holders were eliminated in the first round. Host: RussiaTeams: 32Format: Group stage, KOMatches: 64Goals: 169Winner: FranceFinalists: Croatiagolden boot: Harry Kane (England) Background Russia won the right to host the World Cup in a bidding process that included two joint bids (Portugal-Spain, Belgium-Netherlands) and one bid […]]]>

As was the case in the last World Cup, the holders were eliminated in the first round.

Host: Russia
Teams: 32
Format: Group stage, KO
Matches: 64
Goals: 169
Winner: France
Finalists: Croatia
golden boot: Harry Kane (England)

Background

Russia won the right to host the World Cup in a bidding process that included two joint bids (Portugal-Spain, Belgium-Netherlands) and one bid from England.

FIFA has faced criticism from around the world for Russia’s recent annexation of Crimea, its handling of racism and discrimination against the LGBTQ community, and its handling of doping among its athletes.

The tournament, however, went according to plan and kicked off in a crowded Luzhniki Stadium in Moscow.

Russia cruised to a 5-0 win over Saudi Arabia and then beat Egypt to advance to the knockout stages.

As was the case in the last World Cup, the holders were eliminated in the first round. Germany faced the ignominy of losing two of their group matches and scoring just two goals.

The quarter-finals broke the hearts of the hosts as their unexpected run ended in a penalty shootout against Croatia.

Brazil and Uruguay, meanwhile, were eliminated by Belgium and France respectively.

England, powered by the prolific goalscoring form of Harry Kane, failed in the semi-finals but won acclaim for their run in the tournament.

Croatia have reached their first-ever final, thanks to their golden generation, led by playmaker Luka Modric (winner of the tournament’s Golden Ball).

France had their own star-studded squad, including Paul Pogba, Antoine Griezmann, Kylian Mbappe and N’Golo Kante, among others. Mario Mandzukic’s own goal opened the scoring for France, who then added three more and added another World Cup crown to their name.

Treble

VAR technology was introduced to help referees make decisions.

Fewer red cards were shown compared to previous tournaments.

The smooth operation and the absence of crowd violence were praised by the experts.

Down

The host selection was heavily criticized.

Three members of the Russian team were reportedly listed in a report detailing doping in Russian sport.

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Commodification in Europe worsens working conditions https://rglb.org/commodification-in-europe-worsens-working-conditions/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 21:09:57 +0000 https://rglb.org/commodification-in-europe-worsens-working-conditions/ Competition between workers creates conflict, according to a new book co-authored by research professor Ian Greer, MS ’03, Ph.D. ’05 which explores how European markets work, who creates them, shapes them and organizes, and what they mean for the relationship between labor and capital. “Marketization: How Capitalist Exchange Disciplines Workers and Subverts Democracy,” published November […]]]>

Competition between workers creates conflict, according to a new book co-authored by research professor Ian Greer, MS ’03, Ph.D. ’05 which explores how European markets work, who creates them, shapes them and organizes, and what they mean for the relationship between labor and capital.

“Marketization: How Capitalist Exchange Disciplines Workers and Subverts Democracy,” published November 3 and written with Charles Umneydraws on dozens of conversations with policymakers, administrators, businesses, workers and trade unionists across Europe to examine how markets are created and manipulated by business, policymakers and bureaucrats, and why increased competition can lead to greater inequality.

Published by Bloomsbury Academic, the book summarizes studies conducted over nearly 20 years with colleagues in England, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Greece and Slovenia.

Welfare systems at work, health care and live music were examined by MoreILR director Ithaca Co-Lab, and Umney to track the impact of commercialization. Greer discussed their work in an interview with the ILR school.

Question: What prepared the ground for social protection systems, health care and other parts of the European economy to be so deeply affected by commodification?

Answer: In Europe, there has been a widespread view that the problems plaguing labor markets and health systems can be solved by greater competition. This view comes from the long-standing liberal doctrines behind the European Union’s single market with the free movement of goods, services, capital and labour. This kind of competition has been enshrined in the constitution since the 1950s. But the idea of ​​making people competitive at the national level, within countries, comes mostly from newer neoliberal thinking pushed by think tanks and embraced by political parties from all walks of life since the 1990s. The idea has also been embraced by companies, for example, that create virtual marketplaces using apps, online platforms and algorithms.

Q: You have found new ways to put workers in competition with each other to ostensibly reduce costs and improve quality. What were the consequences?

A: The main consequence is what we call class discipline. Workers are in competition with each other, and it becomes more difficult to negotiate for better wages and working conditions. In the area of ​​live music, for example, we identified certain concerts in London, mainly corporate functions and weddings, which were increasingly found on online platforms. Unlike traditional entertainment agents, who in the past sold “incentive” acts, platforms have made it harder for musicians to negotiate higher fees by making it easier for their customers to compare prices. Similarly, in health care, we have seen examples of working conditions deteriorating due to competitive pressures and privatization. In health, this has not normally resulted in cost and quality improvements, but it has contributed to staff shortages and bureaucratic overload.

Q: You identified how people fight commodification in their daily work. What does it look like?

A: The easiest examples to spot are large protests where workers are mobilizing against privatization or shutting down services and sometimes also demanding regulatory changes that reduce the competitive pressures they face. But there have also been quiet forms of resistance: musicians who refuse to work on the platforms, social workers who take their time to identify the needs of their clients, public sector bureaucrats who do not believe in privatization and listen to the evidence that it doesn’t work, and the community-based nonprofits that are losing money, rather than getting shrewd and corporate.

Q: What do you say to Americans who think this would never happen in the United States?

A: Sometimes I laugh, because I know they are joking. Many Europeans see the United States as a neoliberal model, with our private health care system and work-for-benefit programs replacing what was once called welfare. And the offshoring of jobs to countries with lower wages has been putting competitive pressure on American industrial workers for a few decades now. But behind that question lies a serious point: Much of the politics in the United States is driven by the abuse of private power by billionaires and big corporations, backed by police, prisons and the military. Many on the center-left believe the solution is to break up these combinations and force the capitalists to compete. It’s a good idea in some ways, but it tends to ignore the workers involved.

Mary Catt is Director of Communications at ILR School.

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Iranian who inspired Spielberg’s ‘The Terminal’ dies at Paris airport https://rglb.org/iranian-who-inspired-spielbergs-the-terminal-dies-at-paris-airport/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 01:36:00 +0000 https://rglb.org/iranian-who-inspired-spielbergs-the-terminal-dies-at-paris-airport/ CNN — Mehran Karimi Nasseri, the man who had lived inside Paris-Charles de Gaulle airport for years and inspired Steven Spielberg’s 2004 film “The Terminal,” died Saturday at the same airport. Nasseri was pronounced dead by the airport medical team at Terminal 2F and died of natural causes, an airport spokesperson told CNN. Nasseri, an […]]]>



CNN

Mehran Karimi Nasseri, the man who had lived inside Paris-Charles de Gaulle airport for years and inspired Steven Spielberg’s 2004 film “The Terminal,” died Saturday at the same airport.

Nasseri was pronounced dead by the airport medical team at Terminal 2F and died of natural causes, an airport spokesperson told CNN.

Nasseri, an Iranian refugee, was en route to England via Belgium and France in 1988 when he lost his papers and was unable to board a flight or leave the airport and was stranded in limbo until 2006.

He had “returned to live as a homeless in the public area of ​​the airport since mid-September, after a stay in a rest home”, said the spokesperson.

The spokesperson added that Nasseri was an “iconic figure” at the airport and that “the whole airport community was attached to him, and our staff looked after him as much as possible for many years, even though we would have preferred that he find a real shelter.”

While Nasseri’s story inside the airport was recounted by Tom Hanks in the film “The Terminal”, the airport spokesperson noted that: “Spielberg’s film suggests he was stuck in a transit area at Paris-Charles de Gaulle. In reality, he spent several stays there, but always in the public area of ​​the airport, he was always free to move about.

At one point, the French authorities offered to allow him to reside in France, but Nasseri refused the offer, apparently because he wanted to travel to his original destination, England.

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Signature between Hungary and SEGIB for scholarships in Ibero-America https://rglb.org/signature-between-hungary-and-segib-for-scholarships-in-ibero-america/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 06:24:32 +0000 https://rglb.org/signature-between-hungary-and-segib-for-scholarships-in-ibero-america/ The diplomat The Ibero-American Secretary General, Andres Allamand, and on behalf of the Hungarian Minister for Foreign Affairs and Foreign Trade, Peter Szijjarto, the Hungarian Ambassador to Spain, Katalin Toth, have signed the Memorandum of Understanding between Hungary and SEGIB on Stipendium Hungaricum scholarships for Ibero-American students. This agreement, which offers 20 university scholarships to […]]]>
The diplomat

The Ibero-American Secretary General, Andres Allamand, and on behalf of the Hungarian Minister for Foreign Affairs and Foreign Trade, Peter Szijjarto, the Hungarian Ambassador to Spain, Katalin Toth, have signed the Memorandum of Understanding between Hungary and SEGIB on Stipendium Hungaricum scholarships for Ibero-American students.

This agreement, which offers 20 university scholarships to Ibero-American students, “is the first step on a common path and we are convinced that it will lead Hungary towards future prosperous collaborations with the Ibero-American community in other areas of knowledge, education and social cohesion,” the Hungarian Embassy said in a statement.

Hungary’s associate observer status was approved in December 2020 and formalized at the Ibero-American Summit in Andorra in April 2021. The Hungarian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Foreign Trade, and in particular the Minister Szijjarto, “places particular emphasis on broadening horizons and seeking partnerships outside of Europe,” the statement continues, “which, especially in recent times, is essential. That is why, in 2015, Hungary developed the “Opening to the South” strategy, thanks to which, over the past 7 years, we have reopened several embassies that were closed during the 2008 crisis and decided to open new ones. news in Latin America”.

“This embassy, ​​the statement concludes, works to bring Hungary closer to the Latin American and Caribbean region, taking advantage of the fact that the capital of Spain is the best place in Europe to strengthen ties with our Ibero-American friends. During the upcoming Hungarian EU presidency in trio with Spain and Belgium, our country will support the Spanish priority of highlighting the importance of Latin America for Europe.

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Francois X. ‘Frank’ Steinberg | State https://rglb.org/francois-x-frank-steinberg-state/ Sun, 06 Nov 2022 01:00:21 +0000 https://rglb.org/francois-x-frank-steinberg-state/ Francis X. “Frank” Steinberg of Kingston passed away in eternal life on Wednesday, November 2, 2022. He was born in Wilkes-Barre on February 5, 1925 to Francis C. Steinberg and Rose Corcoran Steinberg. Before graduating from Kingston High School, he enlisted in the military. Frank fought and was wounded in the Battle of the Bulge […]]]>

Francis X. “Frank” Steinberg of Kingston passed away in eternal life on Wednesday, November 2, 2022.

He was born in Wilkes-Barre on February 5, 1925 to Francis C. Steinberg and Rose Corcoran Steinberg. Before graduating from Kingston High School, he enlisted in the military. Frank fought and was wounded in the Battle of the Bulge in Belgium on December 26, 1944. After his service, Frank continued to serve his country in the Veterans Administration. He started as a mail clerk and worked his way up to assistant chief of medical administration.

Frank was an active member of the American Legion Black Diamond Post in Kingston, where he was a former commander. He was a lifelong Detroit Tigers fan and met Sparky Anderson during the 1986 World Series.

In addition to his parents, he was predeceased by his wife, Clara C. Hanks Steinberg; son, Michael F. Steinberg; and her sister, Dorothy Toole.

Frank is survived by his three daughters, Mary Louise Steinberg, Kingston; Rose and her husband, John Senunas, Hanover Twp.; and Claire Marie and her husband, Michael Derks, Fremont, Mich.; grandson, John and his wife, Ellen Garman Senunas; granddaughter, Katie Senunas; and grandson, Todd Steinberg.

The family would like to express their thanks to the doctors, nurses and staff at the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, VA Community Center and Hospice Care Unit.

A Christian burial mass will be celebrated Tuesday at 10:15 a.m. at St. Ignatius Loyola Church. Anyone attending the funeral is asked to go directly to the church.

Friends can call from 4-7 p.m. Monday at Kopicki Funeral Home, 263 Zerbey Avenue, Kingston. Interment will be in St. Mary’s Annunciation Cemetery, Pringle. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to Meals on Wheels.

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Serbia ends visa-free entry for Burundians – DW – 03/11/2022 https://rglb.org/serbia-ends-visa-free-entry-for-burundians-dw-03-11-2022/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 09:01:32 +0000 https://rglb.org/serbia-ends-visa-free-entry-for-burundians-dw-03-11-2022/ Assu is 16 years old. The young Burundian lives in the Brussels transit center for migrants. Like many of his compatriots, he took advantage of Serbia’s visa-free travel policy to reach Europe – in hopes of a better life. “I arrived in Serbia at night and the next morning I went to a place where […]]]>

Assu is 16 years old. The young Burundian lives in the Brussels transit center for migrants. Like many of his compatriots, he took advantage of Serbia’s visa-free travel policy to reach Europe – in hopes of a better life.

“I arrived in Serbia at night and the next morning I went to a place where there were smugglers,” Assu said, recalling the perilous journey that eventually took him to Belgium.

“They helped us get from there to Bosnia. Everyone had to pay €250 ($247) if they wanted to get from one country to another.”

Escape: Dangerous Balkan Road

The Balkan route is risky and expensive: refugees have to pay up to $3,000 to reach their final destination, DW has learned from migrants, many of whom have passed through Bosnia, Croatia, Slovenia, Italy, Switzerland, then Germany or France before arriving in Belgium.

Syrian migrants sneak under a fence as they enter Hungary at the border with Serbia
Many migrants pass through Bosnia, Croatia, Slovenia, Italy, Switzerland, Germany and France before reaching Belgium Image: Bernadett Szabo/Reuters

Assu chose to travel to Brussels, which is home to a large community of Burundian migrants and asylum seekers. His trip to the Belgian capital was traumatic, he said.

He was on the road for weeks with a group of young people, walking through forests and over rough terrain, sleeping in abandoned buildings, while enduring freezing cold. “When you’re left behind on the track, you’re left behind,” Assu told DW.

“When we arrived in Croatia, we were beaten up by the Croatian police before they allowed us to enter their country,” he said.

“We persevered. When we arrived in Slovenia, we were walking on the train tracks and I saw the bodies of several people who had been abandoned there. I just moved away. It was scary.”

Asylum application: Awaiting hearing

Assu is still awaiting a hearing. Belgium has been overwhelmed with the processing of asylum applications since the increasing arrival of Syrian, Afghan and, more recently, Ukrainian refugees.

There is a shortage of housing, food and legal aid, refugees told DW.

The Belgian Federal Agency for the reception of asylum seekers has recognized these shortcomings. Despite the establishment of thousands of transit centers, their capacity is insufficient. Thus, women, children and unaccompanied minors have priority.

As a result, many asylum seekers cannot find shelter and have no choice but to sleep on the streets in the heart of the European capital.

Tony, who has been living in the park near Brussels-North station for two months, is no exception. Now he worries about the coming winter cold.

“I am here because I have many problems in my country, including fear for my safety. I want to continue my professional career in Brussels,” Tony told DW.

He has not yet been invited to any hearings and is only allowed to stay in the park, Tony said. From time to time aid workers come by. He continues to hope for a place at the reception centre.

A bigger push in the EU

Burundi is one of the poorest countries in the world. UN agencies have also reported human rights violations and violence against civilians. The population is facing a humanitarian crisis marked by economic collapse, extreme food shortages and epidemics.

A migrant in the 'Krnjaca' refugee center near Belgrade, Serbia
Migrants say there is a shortage of housing, food and legal aid in BelgiumImage: Darko Vojinovic/AP/picture alliance

More than 228,000 “irregular” migrants entered the EU in the first nine months of 2022, according to the European border agency Frontex. This is a jump of 70% compared to the same period last year.

The Balkan route accounted for the largest share, with over 106,000 entries. Most migrants come from Syria, Afghanistan, Turkey, India, Cuba and Burundi.

Swedish politician Ylva Johansson, who is European Commissioner for Home Affairs, laments the situation.

“We have seen a significant increase in the number of migrants on the Balkan route, and we also see especially those who travel visa-free to Western Balkan countries, including to the European Union area. And that, of course , is something that worries us,” she said.

Criticism of the visa-free regime

Serbia is one of these gateways for migrants. German Interior Minister Nancy Faeser has made it clear that she does not attach much importance to Serbia’s visa policy. This, she said, is based on states not recognizing Kosovo. She finds this “unacceptable”.

In fact, Serbia’s visa policy is closely tied to its claim to Kosovo, which is almost exclusively inhabited by Albanians.

Belgrade retaliates against countries that do not recognize or have withdrawn their recognition from this former Serbian province, independent since 2008.

Burundi withdrew its recognition of Kosovo in 2018. In response, Serbia abolished its visa requirements for Burundians.

Serbia-based political analyst Jaksa Scekic sees the country’s visa exemption for some African countries as a reward for their political stance as problematic.

“When the EU realized this, it threatened Serbia that it would reintroduce visa requirements for its citizens if the refugees continued to arrive,” Skekic said.

Serbia bows to EU pressure

On October 21, the Serbian Foreign Ministry announced that travelers from Burundi and Tunisia should now apply for a visa to enter the country.

Migrants detained by Serbian gendarmes put their hands on their heads
Under pressure from the EU, Serbia decided to drop its visa exemption for certain African countriesImage: Serbian Interior Ministry/AP/picture alliance

“All these poor people are going to try to migrate to the EU,” Scekic told DW.

“Serbia is a transit country. These people don’t want to stay here. They don’t want to work here for €500 a month, they want to work in the EU for €2,000.”

Nikola Kovacevic, a Serbian lawyer and refugee activist, pointed out that “on the one hand, Serbia has the sovereign right to conclude visa agreements with any country according to its own interest. But Serbia is not able to control the migratory flow that accompanies it”. .”

The consequences, he said, are now visible, not only in Serbia, but in many EU member states.

Eric Topona, Ubena Bakari and Idro Seferi contributed to this article.

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Q&A: Belgian coach Martinez on diversity and team development | News Qatar 2022 World Cup https://rglb.org/qa-belgian-coach-martinez-on-diversity-and-team-development-news-qatar-2022-world-cup/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 09:51:35 +0000 https://rglb.org/qa-belgian-coach-martinez-on-diversity-and-team-development-news-qatar-2022-world-cup/ When Roberto Martinez took over from Marc Wilmots as head coach of the Belgian national team in 2016, he was sure the team could achieve great things. Two years later, at the 2018 World Cup in Russia, Belgium finished third, the team’s best finish at the tournament, which featured memorable wins over Japan and Brazil. […]]]>

When Roberto Martinez took over from Marc Wilmots as head coach of the Belgian national team in 2016, he was sure the team could achieve great things.

Two years later, at the 2018 World Cup in Russia, Belgium finished third, the team’s best finish at the tournament, which featured memorable wins over Japan and Brazil.

Belgium will face Canada in their first match on November 23. Al Jazeera caught up with Martinez about the team’s plans and hopes for the upcoming World Cup:

Al Jazeera: What is your assessment of the teams you will face in your squad?

Roberto Martinez: An interesting group because very diverse. There is one European nation that we all know very well: Croatia. They have this wonderful generation that finished second in the 2018 World Cup. Since then there has been a lot of consistency with the coaches and the way they play.

Canada was very impressive. We follow them very closely, a team capable of beating the USA and Mexico. And then Morocco. Unless you are Belgian you don’t understand the story but there is a strong link. There are up to five or six players who were born in Belgium and that creates an even stronger bond. Even the staff members have been with both federations.

There is a very strong community of Moroccans in Belgium. So the ties will make it a great football derby.

Al Jazeera: Belgium finished third in 2018. How has your team evolved since then?

Martinez: There has been an evolution. I think we improved the competitive nature of having three players for each position. It’s getting harder and harder to narrow our list down to 26 players, even in goal. Everyone grows, develops and progresses in their role.

Even in the last game of our qualifying campaign, we were able to make a lot of changes and maintain our level and our way of playing. I’ve been here since 2016 and you can start to see that we’re working so that every player comes knowing what’s expected.

Al Jazeera: You are known to use the 3-4-3 formation. How has it evolved with the Belgian national team?

Martinez: I think systems are not important. The system is sometimes used to tailor your players and get the best relationships out of them. Sometimes it’s to accommodate the opposition.

The way of playing is important. We are quite flexible and we have shown that our 3-4-3, especially in the World Cup, suits our players much better than other systems.

But there will be times when we have to change the system and that’s a big focus we put on our young people. We need to develop flexible players who can play with different systems.

Al Jazeera: Kevin de Bruyne and Eden Hazard are instrumental players and have the quality to make football so easy. How does it feel to coach such talented players?

Martinez: They are two players that I prefer to appreciate as a fan. We don’t often watch in Belgium two players so contrasted by the exceptional talent they bring. We must appreciate them. It is not a question of evaluating them or trying to influence them. It’s more… we have to take advantage of what they bring.

They bring extreme talents. Eden likes to slow down the moment he is on the ball and then execute in individual situations. Kevin de Bruyne picks up the tempo of the game by executing incredible attacking plays. But like all the best players, they have a very good connection.

This is the beautiful aspect of what we have in Belgium. We appreciate this generation for what it is. Because we know it’s a pretty unique moment for our fans to have this kind of performance in front of them.

Eden Hazard warming up for the July 2, 2018 World Cup match against Japan in Russia [Toru Hanai/Reuters]

Al Jazeera: But Hazard and Romelu Lukaku have struggled with injuries and health issues. Is this a big concern for you?

Martinez: Hazard has found a solution since February. I would say with the new treatment he is pain free, he is ready to compete and enjoy his football. The role he has at Real Madrid and in the national team is completely different. I am not concerned at all. Of course, the lack of physical form can be a problem before a World Cup, but we have to adjust these elements.

With Lukaku, it’s very similar. In the summer, he got the move he wanted. He’s a vital part of a team with a huge mission to try and bring the Serie A title back to the city. I see him as someone enjoying every second of this challenge.

Al Jazeera: There has been a fairly recent explosion of Belgian talent. How did it happen?

Martinez: Well, it was a plan. There is no doubt that this was a conscious decision to sit down and try to identify what could be done to best develop Belgian talent. It started in 2000 when the national team was in a very difficult position.

There was a clear direction for all professional teams in Belgium on how to work and develop players from 14 and 15 up to the first team.

That’s the initial look, but then there was Belgium’s success story in Beijing at the Olympics where this generation started feeling the success.

Clubs in Belgium are doing a great job at academy level. There is also the success of each individual player who goes abroad and becomes very important at club level and progresses and goes to the best clubs in Europe. It prepares players in ways you can’t plan. It’s the truth.

Belgian Romelu Lukaku celebrates the goal
Romelu Lukaku celebrates the team’s second goal against Finland on June 21, 2018 at Saint Petersburg Stadium [Anatoly Maltsev/Reuters]

Al Jazeera: In 2018, you beat Brazil in the quarter-finals of the World Cup. Is this the most memorable win of your coaching career?

Martinez: It must be. When you’re a little boy and start loving the game, we all remember a moment on the streets re-enacting a World Cup with your friends.

In the World Cup, you have a tournament within a tournament – the knockout stage and the group stage. Playing a knockout match against Brazil is quite unique. For everyone in Belgium, not only playing against Brazil, but beating them is always a game we will remember and cherish.

The interview has been edited for length and clarity.

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20 years of Orange Peel, helping put Asheville on the American music map https://rglb.org/20-years-of-orange-peel-helping-put-asheville-on-the-american-music-map/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 09:24:25 +0000 https://rglb.org/20-years-of-orange-peel-helping-put-asheville-on-the-american-music-map/ When tickets started selling out for The Orange Peel’s upcoming 20th anniversary celebration, it was obvious that both shows would be packed. The venue, which opened its doors on October 25, 2002, had long established itself as one of the best spaces in the country to listen to music and the back-to-back parties of rapper […]]]>

When tickets started selling out for The Orange Peel’s upcoming 20th anniversary celebration, it was obvious that both shows would be packed.

The venue, which opened its doors on October 25, 2002, had long established itself as one of the best spaces in the country to listen to music and the back-to-back parties of rapper and producer Big Boi (also known for his stint in OutKast), which performs at 8 p.m. on October 28, and the Old Crow String Band Medicine Show, which plays at 8 p.m. on October 29, are just another showcase of performances expected at the downtown club.

Best Asheville Live Music Bets:A McDonald’s-Black Sabbath mashup for Halloween, plus

“We wanted to do something special for Asheville and we didn’t want this very special moment to slip away from us and it just worked. A little magic, you know?” “The best of both worlds – one of the biggest stars in hip-hop and pop right now, then Old Crow, who just represents all that Americana-bluegrass vibe that WNC is so well known for.

“I was working in the club, when these went on sale, and there are a lot of people buying tickets for both. Asheville has a big general music fanbase, and they dig it all.

The Orb performing at the Orange Peel in 2013

The list of artists who have performed at The Orange Peel since its opening is as varied as it is long. There are up and coming musicians on the downtrend of successful radio careers. There are Hall of Famers and regional acts only. There are tribute bands, comedians, benefits, toy exhibits, holiday shows and much more. There’s hip hop, bluegrass, rock, indie, rap, electronic, folk, jam and so many other genres that have been played on stage.

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Biotalys and Novozymes announce the success of Evoca™ https://rglb.org/biotalys-and-novozymes-announce-the-success-of-evoca/ Mon, 24 Oct 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://rglb.org/biotalys-and-novozymes-announce-the-success-of-evoca/ Ghent, BELGIUM and Copenhagen, DENMARK, Oct. 24, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Biotalys (Euronext – BTLS)an agricultural technology (AgTech) company protecting crops and food with protein-based biocontrol solutions, and NOTovozymes, a global leader in biotechnology solutions, including Ag biologics, today announced the successful completion of the feasibility study for Evoca™*, Biotalys’ first proprietary biocontrol product candidate. […]]]>

Ghent, BELGIUM and Copenhagen, DENMARK, Oct. 24, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Biotalys (Euronext – BTLS)an agricultural technology (AgTech) company protecting crops and food with protein-based biocontrol solutions, and NOTovozymes, a global leader in biotechnology solutions, including Ag biologics, today announced the successful completion of the feasibility study for Evoca™*, Biotalys’ first proprietary biocontrol product candidate. Novozymes has obtained proof of concept for a new manufacturing process that offers significant potential advantages in terms of cost of goods and scale, thereby expanding the commercial potential of Evoca as a novel biofungicide.

“Thanks to its cutting-edge expertise in protein fermentation, Novozymes was able to further increase the production efficiency of Evoca”, said Patrice Sellès, CEO of Biotalys. “We will now work on a deeper partnership with Novozymes and explore strategic supply and commercialization agreements for the future generation of Evoca while continuing our ongoing internal development activities.”

Evoca is Biotalys’ first innovative protein-based biofungicide developed on the company’s AGROBODY Foundry™ platform. This technological platform enables Biotalys to discover and develop new biological food protection solutions combining high efficiency, regularity and safety, with new modes of action to combat resistance. Evoca helps sustainably control economically important fungal diseases such as Botrytis and powdery mildew in fruits and vegetables. Demonstrate strong performance over 600+ independent and business-oriented field and greenhouse trials across multiple regions, pathogens and crops, Evoca is expected to gain U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approval in early 2023.

Since entering into a partnership in June 2022, Novozymes has explored additional avenues for scale-up and production of Evoca’s bioactive protein using additional production hosts to those currently used by Biotalys. Novozymes has discovered new ways to increase production and efficiency that could help Biotalys expand the market reach of Evoca, both in the preliminary US and European fruit and vegetable markets currently in the commercialization plan, as well than in other geographies, cultures and diseases. Subject to confirmation of commercial scaling, field trial performance and regulatory procedures, these results may help reduce the time to a commercially attractive version of Evoca.

“The results of this feasibility study with Biotalys will help pave the way for more profitable and sustainable solutions for growers around the world,” noted Thomas Batchelor, Vice President, Agricultural marketing and Novozymes strategy. “Now one step closer to large-scale production, Biotalys and Novozymes have successfully collaborated to provide industry and growers with new ways to safely control harmful pests and diseases and achieve our common goal. to provide highly efficient solutions so that producers can sustainably feed the world. ”

Having successfully completed this key milestone, the two companies are now entering the next phase of their partnership and will explore strategic supply and commercialization agreements for the next generation of Evoca. Novozymes and Biotalys will also explore R&D collaboration beyond Evoca to address the need for effective and more sustainable protein-based biocontrols in new markets and indications through Novozymes’ solutions portfolio and Biotalys’ product candidate pipeline. .

* Evoca™: recording pendingration. This product is currently not registered for sale or use in the United Statesthe European Union, or elsewhere and is not offered for sale.

About Biotalys

Biotalys is an agricultural technology (AgTech) company protecting crops and food with proprietary protein-based biocontrol solutions and aiming to provide alternatives to conventional chemical pesticides for a more sustainable and safe food supply. Based on its novel AGROBODY™ technology platform, Biotalys is developing a strong and diverse pipeline of effective product candidates with a favorable safety profile that aim to control major crop pests and diseases across the entire value chain, from floor to plate. Biotalys was founded in 2013 as a spin-off from VIB (Flanders Institute for Biotechnology) and has been listed on Euronext Brussels since July 2021. The company is based in the biotech cluster of Ghent, Belgium. More information can be found at www.biotalys.com.

For more information, please contact

Toon Musschoot, Head of IR & Communication
T: +32 (0)9 274 54 00
E: Toon.Musschoot@biotalys.com

About Novozymes

Novozymes is the world leader in biological solutions. Together with our customers, partners and the global community, we improve industrial performance while conserving the planet’s resources and helping to build better lives. As the world’s largest provider of enzyme and microbial technologies, our bioinnovation enables higher agricultural yields, lower temperature washing, energy-efficient production, renewable fuels and many other benefits that we rely on today and in the future. We call it Rethinking Tomorrow. www.novozymes.com

NASDAQ OMX: NZYM-B • 6,500 employees • Turnover of DKK 15 billion • Over 30 sectors • Over 700 products

Media Relations

Lina Danstrup | Media Relations Manager | Telephone: +45 30 77 05 52 | lind@novozymes.com

Investor Relations
Tobias Bjorklund | Head of Investor Relations | Phone: +45 30 77 86 82 | tobb@novozymes.com

Important Notice

This announcement contains statements that are, or could be deemed to be, “forward-looking statements”. These forward-looking statements can be identified by the use of forward-looking terminology, including the words “aim”, “believe”, “estimate”, “anticipate”, “expect”, “intend”, ‘may’, ‘will’, ‘plan’, ‘continue’, ‘ongoing’, ‘possible’, ‘predict’, ‘plan’, ‘target’, ‘seek’, ‘would’ or ‘should’, and contain statements made by the company regarding the expected results of its strategy. By their nature, forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties, and readers are cautioned that none of these forward-looking statements offer guarantees of future performance. The actual results of Biotalys may differ materially from those predicted by the forward-looking statements. Biotalys does not undertake to publish any updates or adjustments to these forward-looking statements, except as required by law.

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